Department of Psychology

College of the Sciences and Mathematics

Peoples Building
West Chester University
West Chester, PA 19383
610-436-2532
Department of Psychology
Dr. Kerr, Chairperson
Dr. Johnson, Assistant Chairperson
Dr. Clarke, Graduate Coordinator - Clinical Psychology & Psy.D.
Dr. Yorges, Graduate Coordinator - I/O & General Programs
Bridgid Fitzgerald, Graduate Administrative Assistant

Programs of Study

The Department of Psychology offers the master of arts (M.A.) degree with concentrations in general psychology and industrial/organizational psychology, as well as a doctorate in psychology (Psy.D.) in clinical psychology.

Master of Arts in Psychology (36-39 semester hours)

Doctorate in Psychology (Minimum of 114 semester hours)

The West Chester University Psy.D. program in clinical psychology follows a practitioner-scholar model that prepares students for leadership roles as culturally competent psychologists. Graduates of WCU’s program will be able to employ evidence-based interventions to assess, treat, and prevent mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders particularly among individuals who are at greatest risk and demonstrate the greatest need. The program prepares students to be critical consumers of research, and to develop and evaluate interventions for the purpose of quality improvement and clinical decision-making. The program provides significant training in assessment and therapeutic interventions through didactic coursework and supervised clinical training experiences beginning in the first year of the program. The Psy.D. program is a full-time, year-round program in which students are expected to be on campus for classes, clinical practicum, and dissertation research during the Fall, Spring, and Summer. Students will select elective courses that support their specific training goals and that enhance their learning in one of two specialty tracks: Trauma or Child/Adolescent Mental Health. Graduates of WCU’s program will be adaptive to new knowledge in the field and responsive to emerging needs in an increasingly diverse society.

Psychology Post-Master's Certificate in Clinical Mental Health in Preparation for Counseling Licensure

All applicants to one of West Chester University’s graduate programs will be held to the graduate admissions requirements. When applicable, additional requirements for admission into specific department program(s) may be listed below.

Master's of Psychology

The minimum admission standards for the Department of Psychology are an undergraduate GPA of 3.0, a psychology GPA for three or more courses of 3.25, GRE scores of 500 on both verbal and quantitative areas, and three letters of reference. An interview with the department admissions committee also may be required. Typically, admissions are made on a once-a-year basis with March 1 serving as the application deadline. Students accepted into a concentration may, with the approval of the graduate committee, transfer to another concentration. A few applicants who do not fully meet the outlined admission requirements may be admitted on a provisional basis depending on their maturity, relevant work experiences, and academic promise.

Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology

Preferred minimum scores for consideration for admission in the Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology are:

  • An undergraduate overall GPA of 3.0, and a GPA of 3.25 in psychology
  • GRE general test scores of 153 on the verbal test, 144 on the quantitative test, and 3.0 on the written test
  • Successful completion of PSY courses (at the undergraduate level) in Abnormal/Clinical Psychology, Research Methods, and Statistics
  • Three letters of recommendation (at least two from academic references)
  • A personal goals statement
  • Other requirements, as published in the graduate catalog of the university

In addition, applicants who are not psychology majors may be required to complete undergraduate psychology courses as a condition of admission to the program. A subset of qualified applicants will be selected for interviews. In person interviews and a tour of the department are required as part of the application process. Only students who have completed the interview process will be eligible for matriculation. 

All graduate students are held to the academic policies and procedures outlined in the graduate catalog. Students are encouraged to review departmental handbooks for program tips, suggested course sequences, and explanations of procedures. When applicable, additional policies for specific department programs may be listed below.

Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology

Degree Completion Policy

Students will complete course work in years 1 and 2, defend their dissertation proposal, complete course work in year 3, and pass the comprehensive exams thus earning their M.A. degree in Psychology. Students will then complete course work in year 4, defend their dissertation, and complete a full time internship in order to earn a Psy.D.

There will be annual reviews of student progress. Psy.D. students will prepare an annual review of program progress for faculty. Faculty will review student progress as described below:

  • At the end of the first year, all students are evaluated by the Clinical Training Committee.  Any problems noted, suggesting an inability to effectively complete the program, will be addressed formally with the student, and the student will be placed on probation.  Mid-way through the second year, any student on probation is re-evaluated and provided feedback on their progress (or lack thereof).  (ANY student may be re-evaluated at this point if a concern has developed following the initial 1st year evaluation.) At the end of the 2nd year, all students are again evaluated.  Those who are evaluated favorably will continue with the program and upon successful completion of the dissertation proposal and the comprehensive exam are awarded their Master’s degree.  Those who are evaluated unfavorably will be dismissed from the program.  The Clinical Training Committee will determine whether it is appropriate to let the student complete the dissertation proposal and comprehensive exams in order to earn the Master’s degree.
  • Following the successful completion of the dissertation proposal, students apply for degree candidacy.  Degree candidacy can be denied and students removed from the program at this point.
  • All students are evaluated following the comprehensive exams (i.e., end of year 3).  Any student can be removed from the program for failing the comprehensive exams.

Professors

Eleanor Brown (2005)

B.A., Haverford College; Ph.D., University of Delaware

Susan Gans (1997)

B.A., New York University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago

Lauri Hyers (2004)

B.A., Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University

Vanessa K. Johnson (1999)

Assistant Chairperson, Psychology

B.S., University of Washington, Seattle; M.A., Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley

Sandra L. Kerr (1994)

Chairperson, Psychology

B.A., Boston College; M.A., Ph.D., State University of New York at Stony Brook

V. Krishna Kumar (1977)

B.S., Osmania University (India); M.S., Indian Agricultural Research Institute; M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison

Deborah Mahlstedt (1988)

B.S., State University of New York at Rockport; M.Ed., Ph.D., Temple University

Loretta Rieser-Danner (1997)

B.S., Pennsylvania State University; Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin

Jasmin Tahmaseb-McConatha (1990)

B.A., University of Utah; M.S., Jacksonville State University; Ph.D., University of Georgia

Thomas Treadwell (1968)

B.A., Morris Harvey College; M.S., University of Bridgeport Moreno Institute, New York (Certified Psychodramatist, T.E.P.); Ed.D, Temple University

Stefani Yorges (1996)

Graduate Coordinator, Psychology

B.A., Hastings College; M.S., Ph.D., Purdue University

Deanne U. Zotter (1991)

B.A., Bloomsburg University; M.A., Ph.D., Kent State University

Associate Professors

Julian Azorlosa (2001)

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Delaware

Angela Clarke (2007)

Graduate Coordinator, Psychology

B.S., M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill

Aaron S. Rundus (2011)

B.A., University of South Florida; M.S., Ph.D., University of California, Davis

Geeta Shivde (2005)

B.A., Oberlin College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Oregon

Assistant Professors

Janet Chang (2016)

B.A., Swarthmore College; M.A., Ph.D., University of California, Davis

Erin Michelle Hill (2013)

B.A., Laurentian University; M.A., Carleton University; Ph.D., Auckland University of Technology

Farzin Irani (2014)

B.S., University of Toronto; M.S., Villanova University; Ph.D., Drexel University

Vipanchi Mishra (2014)

B.A., M.A., University of Delhi; M.S., University of Hartford; Ph.D., University at Albany, SUNY

Karen J. Mitchell (2014)

B.A., the Pennsylvania State University; M.A., Ph.D., Kent State University

Vahe Permzadian (2016)

B.A., Queens College, City University of New York; M.A., Brooklyn College, City University of New York

Ekeoma E. Uzogara (2016)

B.A., Boston University; M.A., M.P.H., Ph.D., University of Michigan

PSY

PSY 506. Learning And Cognition. 3 Credits.

Survey and critical review of existing theories of learning and relevant research data.
Typically offered in Spring.

PSY 510. Graduate Research in Psychology. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to allow graduate psychology students an opportunity to learn about and engage in psychological research, independent of required or optional thesis research. Most 510 research participation will be of a collaborative nature, with students working closely with a departmental faculty member.
Consent: Permission of the Department required to add.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.
Repeatable for Credit.

PSY 512. Psychology Of Personality. 3 Credits.

The interaction and effects of forces that influence personality development. Normal and neurotic development are contrasted. Principles of personality measurement are explored.
Typically offered in Fall.

PSY 514. Group Interventions II. 3 Credits.

Continuation of PSY 513 at an advanced level with emphasis on clinical sociometry, the social atom concept, auxiliary ego techniques, and directing. Instruction will include both didactic and experiential modes.

PSY 521. Issues in Autism: Diagnosis and Behavioral Treatments. 3 Credits.

Study of the assessment and treatment of children and adults with autism spectrum disorders, related disorders, and associated problems. Detailed coverage of current validated assessment and treatment practices, with emphasis on behavior analytic procedures. Instruction will occur via current books, periodicals, testing materials, videos, and role-play activities.
Distance education offering may be available.

PSY 524. Psychometrics: Measurement and Evaluation. 3 Credits.

A survey of measurement theory in psychology with emphasis on the logic of measurement, scaling models, statistical methods, construction of valid and reliable measures.
Pre / Co requisites: PSY 524 requires prerequisite of PSY 501.
Typically offered in Fall & Summer.

PSY 530. Human Sexual Behavior. 3 Credits.

Contact department for more information about this course.

PSY 540. Multicultural Psychology. 3 Credits.

Contact department for more information about this course.
Typically offered in Spring.

PSY 543. Psychology of Group Processes. 3 Credits.

Survey of psychological group processes, tracing the origins and historical development of the major theoretical orientations.
Typically offered in Spring.

PSY 546. Advanced Systems Analysis. 3 Credits.

Systems analysis applied to the design, development, and management of human performance systems within organizations.
Typically offered in Fall.

PSY 547. Interpersonal Relationships within Groups. 3 Credits.

A study of processes and factors in establishing, maintaining, and terminating relationships via the use of group methods.
Typically offered in Spring.

PSY 560. Advanced Industrial Psychology. 3 Credits.

Advanced survey of theory, research, and applications in major topical areas of industrial psychology. Topics include job analysis, employee recruitment, employee selection, selection decisions, performance appraisal, uses and development of psychological tests.
Distance education offering may be available.
Typically offered in Fall.

PSY 562. Organizational Psychology. 3 Credits.

Advanced survey of theory and research on the behavior of individuals and groups in organizations. Topics include job attitudes, leadership, work motivation, organizational culture, teams and group processes.
Distance education offering may be available.
Typically offered in Spring.

PSY 565. Psychology Of Women. 3 Credits.

Contact department for more information about this course.
Typically offered in Fall.

PSY 566. Seminar In Indust & Organizat Psychology. 3 Credits.

Recent technical, legal, social, and ethical aspects of the field are covered. Affirmative action and assessment, equal opportunity, minorities and women in the work force, and other pertinent issues are emphasized.
Pre / Co requisites: PSY 566 requires prerequisite of PSY 501 and PSY 502 and PSY 524 and PSY 560 and PSY 562.
Typically offered in Spring.

PSY 567. Psychology & Training. 3 Credits.

This course is focused on psychological principles and methods used for planning and analysis of training performance in organizations. Topics include training needs assessment, methods of training, transfer of training effects as well as design and experimental evaluation of training techniques.
Typically offered in Fall.

PSY 568. Psychopharmacology. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the mechanisms of action, effects and side effects of those psychoative drugs most commonly encountered by mental health practitioners. Both psychotherapeutic drugs and drugs of abuse will be discussed. The course will focus on the implications of these drugs for our understanding of the neurochemical basis of both noraml and abnormal behavior.
Consent: Permission of the Department required to add.

PSY 569. Ethics and Professional Skills in Organizational Practice. 3 Credits.

Tools, techniques, and practices required for successfully applying Industrial/Organizational psychology knowledge within organizations.
Pre / Co requisites: PSY 569 requires a prerequisite of PSY 560 or PSY 562.
Distance education offering may be available.
Typically offered in Fall.

PSY 571. Workplace Stress and Health. 3 Credits.

Advanced survey of processes, theories, research, and practical applications related to stress and health in the workplace. Topics include workplace stress interventions, corporate wellness programs, and work-life integration.
Distance education offering may be available.
Typically offered in Fall.

PSY 572. Introduction to People Analytics. 3 Credits.

An introduction to metrics, analysis, measurement, and data interpretation critical to human resource (people) analytics. Students will learn various quantitative decision-making techniques and methods for common personnel management issues such as talent acquisition, training evaluation, performance management, employee attitudes and engagement, HR effectiveness, and financial return-on-investment.
Distance education offering may be available.
Typically offered in Spring.

PSY 581. Eating Disorders. 3 Credits.

Contact department for more information about this course.

PSY 590. Topical Seminar in Psychology. 1-3 Credits.

Special topics in psychology not offered under existing regularly offered courses.
Consent: Permission of the Department required to add.
Repeatable for Credit.

PSY 600. Research Report. 3 Credits.

Contact department for more information about this course.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

PSY 601. Introduction to Statistics/Research Methods. 3 Credits.

Critical examination of research methods in psychology, including experimental and quasi-experimental designs, correlational methods, and survey methods. Students will receive practical experience in the design, implementation, analysis, and interpretation of data, and in preparation of written reports for research projects.
Typically offered in Fall.

PSY 602. Advanced Statistical Methods. 3 Credits.

Critical examination of advanced research methods in psychology, including experimental and quasi-experimental designs, correlational methods, and survey methods. Students will receive practical experience in the design, implementation, analysis, and interpretation of data, and in preparation of written reports for research projects.
Pre / Co requisites: PSY 602 requires prerequisite of PSY 601.
Typically offered in Spring.

PSY 604. History and Systems of Psychology. 3 Credits.

An integrated overview of the history of psychology as well as the systems, theories, and fundamental issues with which psychologists have concerned themselves in the past, recent, and current stages of the science.
Typically offered in Summer.

PSY 605. Biological Bases of Behavior. 3 Credits.

This course provides an overview of the anatomical, physiological, endocrinological and psychopharmacological underpinnings of behavior, including emotion, learning, memory, movement, and neurobehavioral dysfunction.
Typically offered in Fall.

PSY 607. Cognitive-Affective Bases of Behavior. 3 Credits.

This course emphasizes cognitive and affective processes that influence behavior, and the interaction of emotion and cognition. Areas of emphasis include attention, memory, decision making, emotion regulation and disorders of emotion.
Typically offered in Spring.

PSY 608. Developmental Bases of Behavior. 3 Credits.

Study of developmental theories explaining typical human development. Emphasis on current theoretical issues involved in the effects of early experience and environment.
Typically offered in Fall.

PSY 609. Advanced Social Psychology. 3 Credits.

Emphasizes contemporary approaches to the study of social behavior including cognitive, social, and experimental and quasi-experimental research methodology.
Typically offered in Fall.

PSY 610. Thesis. 3-6 Credits.

An original empirical study.
Consent: Permission of the Department required to add.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.
Repeatable for Credit.

PSY 630. Internship in Industrial/Organizational. 3 Credits.

Supervised professional participation in applied psychological activities within a business or organizational setting.
Consent: Permission of the Department required to add.
Typically offered in Fall.

PSY 680. Advanced Health Psychology. 3 Credits.

An in-depth study of the behavioral, biolgoical, psychological and social factors in physical health and illness. Emphasis will be placed on contemporary health psychology research and current areas of focus in the field.
Typically offered in Fall.

PSY 700. Adult Psychopathology. 3 Credits.

Advanced study of abnormal human behavior and a description of pertinent types, including symptoms, causes, and treatment. Current and recent theoretical approaches and research findings relevant to the etiology and treatment of these disorders.
Consent: Permission of the Department required to add.
Typically offered in Fall.

PSY 701. Child and Adolescent Psychopathology. 3 Credits.

Advanced study of abnormal child and adolescent behavior and a description of pertinent types, including symptoms, causes, and treatment. Current and recent theoretical approaches and research findings relevant to the etiology and treatment of these disorders.
Pre / Co requisites: PSY 701 requires prerequisite of PSY 700.
Typically offered in Fall.

PSY 705. Multicultural Clinical Psychology. 3 Credits.

This course provides students an overview of multiculturalism in the practice of clinical psychology. The focus of this course is on the role of culture, viewed broadly in terms of multiple social identities (e.g., class, race, age, gender, sexual orientation) and the intersection of these identities, in understanding human behavior, particularly in the context of therapeutic interactions.
Typically offered in Fall.

PSY 708. Ethical, Legal, and Professional Issues in Psychotherapy. 3 Credits.

The focus of this course is on the ethical practice of counseling/psychotherapy. Ethical standards of the American Psychological Association, the American Counseling Association, and Pennsylvania law will guide discussion of the ethical and legal issues that may arise for psychotherapists during their various professional activities.
Typically offered in Summer.

PSY 710. Psychotherapy I: Cognitive and Behavior Therapy. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to familiarize students with the cognitive model from an applied and theoretical therapeutic perspective. Students will become acquainted with some of the commonly used assessment tools and various intervention techniques in cognitive behavioral treatment. The course is viewed as a practice-application environment utilizing basic CBT techniques emphasizing collaborative components of the cognitive model.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

PSY 712. Psychotherapy II: Interpersonal and Psychodynamic Theory. 3 Credits.

This course will provide students the opportunity to learn skills necessary for conducting individual psychotherapy using interpersonal and psychodynamic theories.
Pre / Co requisites: PSY 712 requires prerequisite of PSY 710.
Typically offered in Spring.

PSY 714. Psychotherapy III: Child and Family Therapy. 3 Credits.

This course will provide students the opportunity to learn skills necessary for conducting psychotherapy with children, adolescents, and families. Theoretical considerations, principles, techniques, and problems involved in psychotherapy with children, adolescents, and families will be discussed. Contemporary theories of psychotherapy encompass a wide range of thought, differing models of mind, and competing clinical perspectives. In this course we will contrast and evaluate various psychotherapy models for treating children and adolescents, including psychodynamic, cognitive behavioral, narrative, and family systems approaches.
Pre / Co requisites: PSY 714 requires prerequisites of PSY 710 and PSY 712.
Typically offered in Spring.

PSY 716. Psychotherapy IV: Group Dynamics/Group Interventions. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the practice of group psychotherapy from a variety of theoretical orientations.
Pre / Co requisites: PSY 716 requires prerequisites of PSY 710, PSY 712, and PSY 714.
Typically offered in Spring.

PSY 720. Assessment I: Intellectual Assessment. 3 Credits.

Historical development, administration, scoring, and interpretation of the Wechsler scales.
Typically offered in Fall.

PSY 721. Assessment II: Personality Assessment. 3 Credits.

History and theory of personality testing. Introduction to administration, scoring, and interpretation of projective and objective techniques.
Typically offered in Summer.

PSY 730. Clinical Skills Practicum. 3 Credits.

The focus of this course is on the effective practice of individual counseling/psychotherapy. The primary emphasis in the course is on process issues that are typically encountered by many psychotherapists, regardless of their specific theoretical orientation.
Pre / Co requisites: PSY 730 requires prerequisites of PSY 700 and PSY 710.
Typically offered in Fall.

PSY 731. Clinical Supervision. 1 Credit.

For students working in the WCU Community Mental Health Clinic. This course provides face-to-face, individual supervision with a member of the WCU Clinical Psychology faculty. By working closely with their supervisors, students will develop their assessment and psychotherapy skills, will learn appropriate professional conduct, and will develop into ethical and effective mental health practitioners.
Pre / Co requisites: PSY 731 requires prerequisite of PSY 730.
Consent: Permission of the Department required to add.
Typically offered in Fall, Spring & Summer.
Repeatable for Credit.

PSY 732. Consultation and Supervision in Clinical Practice. 3 Credits.

This course will provide students with an overview of the theory, research, and practice of clinical supervision and consultation within a multicultural framework. Students will develop skills that will help them become effective and ethical supervisors and consultants.
Pre / Co requisites: PSY 732 requires prerequisite of PSY 708.
Typically offered in Spring.

PSY 733. Psychology Clinic Practicum. 2 Credits.

For students working in the WCU Community Mental Health Clinic. This course will provide supervised, educational, graduate-level experience in an outpatient mental health setting in the intake process, assessment, diagnosis, report writing, and individual, family, and/or group psychotherapy.
Pre / Co requisites: PSY 733 requires prerequisite of PSY 730.
Consent: Permission of the Department required to add.
Typically offered in Fall, Spring & Summer.
Repeatable for Credit.

PSY 734. Advanced Clinical Practicum. 2-3 Credits.

Supervised professional participation in applied psychological activities, or projects in cooperating agencies and institutions.
Pre / Co requisites: PSY 734 requires prerequisite of PSY 730.
Consent: Permission of the Department required to add.
Typically offered in Fall, Spring & Summer.
Repeatable for Credit.

PSY 740. Research Practicum. 3 Credits.

This course gives graduate psychology students an opportunity to learn about and engage in psychological research to augment the dissertation research by assisting students in learning the process of developing a research program and a dissertation proposal.
Pre / Co requisites: PSY 740 requires prerequisite of PSY 601 and PSY 602.
Typically offered in Fall & Summer.
Repeatable for Credit.

PSY 742. Program Evaluation. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to introduce advanced graduate students to a variety of approaches to program evaluation and a range of skills required to develop and implement an evaluation. Topics include needs analysis, statement of objectives, definition and verification of treatment, operational measures, evaluation design, analysis/interpretation of data, and report writing.
Typically offered in Fall.

PSY 750. Community Interventions. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the examination of interventions, including prevention programs, for contemporary social problems. Students will learn skills needed to conduct community assessment, intervention, and evaluation. Emphasis will be placed on contextual analyses, community strengths, and culturally-appropriate solutions.
Typically offered in Spring.

PSY 752. Clinical Neuropsychology. 3 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to the subspecialty of clinical neuropsychology, with a focus on understanding brain-behavior relationships using culturally and ethically informed neuropsychological assessment methods.
Pre / Co requisites: PSY 752 requires prerequisite of PSY 605 and PSY 721.
Typically offered in Summer.

PSY 760. Adolescence and Emerging Adulthood. 3 Credits.

Key topics of adolescence and emerging adulthood. Focus will be on the (a) biological, cognitive, social, emotional, and psychological changes of these age periods, (b) contexts of development, such as families, peers, and schools, and (c) ways in which individual development is related to income, gender, sexual orientation, and racial/ethnic group membership.
Pre / Co requisites: PSY 760 requires prerequisite of PSY 608 and PSY 701.
Typically offered in Fall.

PSY 761. Infant Mental Health. 3 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to infant mental health, a growing area of psychological research and practice. Among other topics, we will cover development and context, risk and protective factors, assessment, psychopathology or significant difficulties, and prevention and intervention.
Pre / Co requisites: PSY 761 requires prerequisite of PSY 608 and PSY 701.
Typically offered in Spring.

PSY 770. Trauma and Treatment. 3 Credits.

This course reviews the history, etiology, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of trauma-related dysfunction, particularly post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), acute stress disorder (ASD), and common comorbid conditions.
Pre / Co requisites: PSY 770 requires prerequisite of PSY 700, PSY 710, and PSY 712.
Typically offered in Summer.

PSY 780. Trauma Interventions for Children and Adolescents. 3 Credits.

Critical examination of etiology and treatment issues related to psychology studies in traumatic stress for children. Review of empirical research and psychotherapeutic principles for mitigating the negative consequences of trauma in children.
Pre / Co requisites: PSY 780 requires prerequisites of PSY 701, PSY 710, PSY 712, and PSY 714.
Typically offered in Fall.

PSY 781. Ecological Contexts of Trauma. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the ecological contexts of psychological trauma, ranging from microsystem influences such as family and friends to macrosystem influences such as the broader culture and its systems of oppression. Consideration of ecological context is important for understanding how to define traumatic events, why these events occur, why some social groups are disproportionately likely to experience them, and how we might promote recovery for individuals and communities as well as prevent or reduce the occurrence of future trauma.
Pre / Co requisites: PSY 781 requires prerequisites of PSY 605, PSY 609, PSY 700, and PSY 701.
Typically offered in Spring.

PSY 800. Dissertation. 3 Credits.

An empirical research study with an oral defense approved by at least 2 faculty members from the WCU Psychology Department.
Pre / Co requisites: PSY 800 requires prerequisite of PSY 740.
Consent: Permission of the Department required to add.
Typically offered in Fall, Spring & Summer.
Repeatable for Credit.

PSY 890. Pre-Doctoral Clinical Internship. 1-6 Credits.

Contact department for more information about this course.
Pre / Co requisites: PSY 890 requires prerequisite of PSY 734 and permission of program director.
Consent: Permission of the Department required to add.
Typically offered in Fall, Spring & Summer.
Repeatable for Credit.

PSY 999. Transfer Credits (Graduate). 3-9 Credits.

Transfer credit.