Department of Kinesiology

College of Health Sciences

206 Sturzebecker Health Sciences Center
610-436-2260
Department of Kinesiology
Melissa Reed, Chairperson
Fran Cleland, Assistant Chairperson
Melissa Whidden, Assistant Chairperson

The Department of Kinesiology offers two programs leading to the Bachelor of Science Degree.

  • The B.S. in Health and Physical Education - Teacher Certification. This program prepares students to teach K-12 health and physical education.
  • The B.S. in Exercise Science. The purpose of the exercise science (ES) program is to prepare students for positions in the growing and multifaceted field of health and fitness or to gain admission into various professional and graduate programs. In addition, students will be prepared for success in appropriate certification examinations. The primary focus of the ES program is for each student to develop abilities and master knowledge and skills necessary to provide leadership in the health and fitness fields, as well as be a successful member of society. Concentrations offered within the curriculum include Exercise Specialist, Pre-Physical Therapy, Pre-Occupational Therapy, and Pre-Chiropractic Therapy. The Bachelor of Science is nationally accredited by the Committee on Accreditation for the Exercise Sciences (CoAES).

Facilities

The department is housed on West Chester University's South Campus in the Russell L. Sturzebecker Health Sciences Center. The SHSC features the following indoor facilities: five full-size, multipurpose gymnasiums; one fully equipped gymnastics gym; dance studio; strength training facility; human performance laboratory; 17 classrooms; aquatics center featuring two pools and a 14.5-foot diving well. Outdoor facilities include multipurpose playing fields, tennis courts, softball fields/baseball fields, quarter-mile track, three outdoor adventure education facilities, and a climbing wall.

All undergraduate students are held to the academic policies and procedures outlined in the undergraduate catalog.  Students are encouraged to review departmental handbooks for program tips, suggested course sequences, and explanations of procedures. When applicable, additional policies for specific department program(s) may be listed below.

Professors

Eve Atkinson (2008)

B.S., M.S., West Chester University; D.Ed., Temple University

Frances E. Cleland (1994)

Graduate Coordinator, Kinesiology

Assistant Chairperson, Kinesiology

B.S., Purdue University; M.S., P.E.D., Indiana University

Kathleen Ellis (2009)

Graduate Coordinator, Kinesiology

B.A., University of North Carolina at Wilmington; M.Ed., Bowling Green State University; Ph.D., Michigan State University

Frank F. Fry (1993)

B.S., West Chester University; M.Ed., Colorado State University; D.PE., Springfield College

John G. Helion (1990)

B.S., State University of New York; M.A., Ed.M., Ed.D., Columbia University

Monica P. Lepore (1983)

B.S., College of Mount Saint Vincent; M.S., University of Wisconsin; Ed.D., New York University

Margaret Ottley (2001)

B.A., Spelman College; M.Ed., Ph.D., New York University

David J. Stearne (2005)

Graduate Coordinator, Kinesiology

B.A., Rowan University; M.S., University of Florida; Ph.D., Temple University

W. Craig Stevens (1992)

B.A., Johns Hopkins University; M.S., Springfield College; Ph.D., Temple University

Karin A.e. Volkwein (1992)

Staatsexamen, University of Marburg (Germany); Ph.D., University of Tennessee

Associate Professors

Stanley J. Cramer (2000)

B.S., M.S., West Chester University; Ph.D., Temple University

Matthew Cummiskey (2009)

B.S., Ithaca College; M.S., State University of New York at Cortland; Ph.D., Temple University

Melissa A. Reed (2011)

Chairperson, Kinesiology

B.S., East Stroudsburg University; M.A., Ph.D., East Carolina University

Melissa A. Whidden (2011)

Assistant Chairperson, Kinesiology

B.S., M.S., State University of New York at Buffalo; Ph.D., University of Florida

Assistant Professors

Kenneth Clark (2016)

B.A., Swarthmore College; M.S., West Chester University; Ph.D., Southern Methodist University

Hyunsoo Kim (2016)

B.A., M.A., Yonsei University; M.S., University of North Carolina, Greensboro; Ph.D., Brigham Young University

Selen Razon (2016)

B.S. Université Paris 5 René Descartes, France; M.S. University of Miami; Ph.D. Florida State University

Instructor

Ed Kubachka (2016)

B.S., Pennsylvania State University; B.S., M.S., West Chester University

DST

DST 357. Deaf Culture Perspectives. 3 Credits.

This course will cover a variety of issues related to the Deaf community. It will acquaint students with the history, traditions, and values within the culture of Deaf people. The history of deaf people will focus on struggles, cultural Vs pathological views, legislature and accomplishments. Traditions include the use of humor, success stories, behaviors, and empowerment. Values include the importance of Deaf culture's perspectives on education of deaf children, communication issues, technology, and preservation of American Sign Language.
Pre / Co requisites: DST 357 requires a prerequisite of CSD 110 or KIN 110.
Gen Ed Attribute: American Sign Language Culture Cluster, Foreign Language Culture Cluster.
Typically offered in Spring.

EXL

EXL 262. Biomechanics Lab. 1 Credit.

Students will develop a fundamental understanding of basic principles of biomechanics related to selected mechanical and anatomical laws of motion through hands on laboratory experiences and data collection. Analysis of force, motion, muscle activation, balance and stability and structural alignment will be applied to functional exercise and sport related activities.
Pre / Co requisites: EXL 262 requires prerequisites of PHY 100 or PHY 130 and BIO 259. Corequisite: EXS 262.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

EXL 380. Exercise Physiology Lab. 1 Credit.

This one credit laboratory course will enable the student to learn from both "hands-on" and computer simulated experiences. In both cases, reinforcing and illuminating concepts and physiological principles introduced in the EXS 380 lecture class.
Pre / Co requisites: EXL 380 requires prerequisite BIO 269 and EXS 180 and COREQ: EXS 380.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

EXS

EXS 101. Group Exercise Leadership. 2 Credits.

The major goals of this course are to provide students with professional instruction on how to teach a variety of group exercise classes by applied learning techniques, to be able to lead exercise classes for all levels of fitness and for a wide variety of participants, including children, the elderly, and other special populations, and to modify moves to accommodate them. This course is designed to prepare the student to pass a nationally accredited certification exam for group exercise leadership.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

EXS 102. Fundamentals of Resistance Training Techniques. 2 Credits.

Resistance training, also called weight training or strength training, is structured exercise in which muscles of the body are forced to contract under tension using weights, body weight, or other devices in order to stimulate growth, strength, power and endurance. This course provides the beginner student with hands-on experience using these various methods along with instruction on proper exercise technique and safety precautions.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

EXS 180. Lifetime Fitness Concepts. 3 Credits.

Designed to provide an interdisciplinary understanding of the relationship between lifestyle, physical fitness, and health and well-being.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

EXS 222. Introduction to Medical Terminology and Drug Classifications. 2 Credits.

This course offers an introduction to common clinical abbreviations and medical terms through an analysis of their construction including prefix, suffix, root, connecting and combining forms. The student acquires an understanding of medical meanings applicable to structure, function and diseases of the human body. Students will also learn how drugs are classified and for what major conditions they are used and learn how to use the Physicians Desk Reference.
Distance education offering may be available.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

EXS 223. Kinetic Anatomy. 2 Credits.

The purpose of this course is to lay the foundation for students to learn how anatomy affects movement of the human body. The course will build upon, reinforce, and challenge the student's basic knowledge of structural anatomy with the intention of acquiring a mastery of basic concepts in this discipline. Presentation of concepts will begin with whole body orientation by region, and then work additively and systematically from skeletal anatomy identifications and joint structure / alignment analysis, through muscular and neurovascular investigation to provide a comprehensive study of clinically applied structural anatomy.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

EXS 241. Body Systems and Applied Anatomy I. 3 Credits.

This class introduces basic anatomical and physiological concepts critical to understanding human movement, exercise, physical education and how the human body functions. The class examines the anatomy, physiology and exercise physiology of the skeletal and muscular systems. Throughout the course, special attention will be paid to the impact of development (growth and maturation) on the systems covered. Students will be required to apply these anatomical and physiological principles to physical education, exercise and sport.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

EXS 262. Biomechanics. 3 Credits.

Students will develop a fundamental understanding of selected mechanical and anatomical laws of motion, actions caused by forces and their application to the study of mechanical structure and analysis of motion Students will be able to use and apply these principles to various forms of movement.
Pre / Co requisites: EXS 262 requires prerequisite PHY 100 or PHY 130 and BIO 259 and COREQ: EXL 262.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

EXS 361. Body Systems and Applied Anatomy II. 3 Credits.

This class introduces basic anatomical and physiological concepts critical to understanding human movement, exercise, physical education and how the human body functions. The class examines the anatomy, physiology and exercise physiology of the following systems: nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, and renal systems. Metabolism and the generation of energy will also be discussed. Throughout the course, special attention will be paid to the impact of development (growth and maturation) on the systems covered. Students will be required to apply these anatomical and physiological principles to physical education, exercise and sport.
Pre / Co requisites: EXS 361 requires prerequisite of EXS 241.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

EXS 364. Introduction to Exercise Physiology. 3 Credits.

Builds on the physiological concepts introduced in EXS 241. Students will be required to apply these physiological principles to physical education, exercise and sport.
Pre / Co requisites: EXS 364 requires a prerequisite of EXS 241.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

EXS 370. Motor Learning. 3 Credits.

An undergraduate course that examines the behavioral, physiological, and psychological principles underlying motor control and motor learning. Specific topics include classifications and measurement of motor performance; the role and function of sensory processes, perception, memory, and attention; and the delivery of feedback and structure of practice.
Pre / Co requisites: EXS 370 requires a prerequisite of BIO 259.
Distance education offering may be available.
Typically offered in Fall, Spring & Summer.

EXS 375. Introduction to Sport Exercise & Performance Psychology. 3 Credits.

An undergraduate course aimed at covering exercise behavior adoption and its maintenance. This course will introduce students with both the theories and practices inherent in the field of exercise psychology. Additional emphasis of this course will include intervention strategies to promote exercise behaviors and long-term adherence to a physically active lifestyle as well as recent research findings on the effectiveness of these approaches.
Pre / Co requisites: EXS 375 requires prerequisites of EXS 370 and PSY 100.
Distance education offering may be available.
Typically offered in Fall, Spring & Summer.

EXS 380. Exercise Physiology. 3 Credits.

This three credit course investigates the physiological principles which explain how the human body responds and adapts to physical activity, exercise and work.
Pre / Co requisites: EXS 380 requires prerequisite BIO 269 and EXS 180; co-requisite of EXL 380.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

EXS 381. Fitness Assessment - Exercise Prescription. 4 Credits.

Designed to prepare students to assess the physical fitness levels of healthy but sedentary adults and prescribe individualized exercise programs.
Pre / Co requisites: EXS 381 requires prerequisite of EXS 375, EXS 380, EXL 380 and current CPR certification.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

EXS 482. Exercise Techniques and Physical Condition. 4 Credits.

Analysis of various exercise techniques, and devices and systems emphasizing their use and safety. Clinical experience in strength and range of motion (ROM) testing and prescription.
Pre / Co requisites: EXS 482 requires prerequisites of EXS 262, EXS 380, and EXL 380.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

EXS 484. Organization and Management of Adult Fitness Progs Clin/Sem. 3 Credits.

Designed to provide students with practical experience in organizing and managing physical fitness programs for adults.
Pre / Co requisites: EXS 484 requires prerequisite of EXS 380 and EXL 380 or instructor permission.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

EXS 486. Exercise Prescription - Special Population. 3 Credits.

Designed to provide students with practical experience in organizing and managing physical fitness programs for adults.
Pre / Co requisites: EXS 486 requires prerequisite of EXS 381.
Distance education offering may be available.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

EXS 487. Physical Activity and the Environment. 3 Credits.

A survey course investigating the multidisciplinary nature of environmental physiology. It will explore the impact of different environments on the physiology of humans while at work and play. This course will examine the thermal environments (hot, cold, humidity), baraphysiology (altitude and depth), microgravity and space, air pollution, and chronobiological rhythms. Laboratory experiences, both computer simulation and "hands-on," will be included in the course.
Pre / Co requisites: EXS 487 requires prerequisite of EXS 380 or BIO 468 or BIO 469.

EXS 489. Clinical Exercise Testing and Prescription. 4 Credits.

Designed to teach students how to administer graded exercise tests, take blood pressure and heart rate measurements during exercise, administer and interpret standard resting and exercise 12-lead electrocardiograms at a fundamental level, and how to properly prescribe exercise based on test results and using metabolic calculations. Understanding the athletic heart is a major focus. The course is offered in an online format with a portion of hands-on laboratory experience.
Pre / Co requisites: EXS 489 requires prerequisite of EXS 381 and current CPR certification.
Distance education offering may be available.
Typically offered in Fall, Spring & Summer.

EXS 490. Internship I. 3 Credits.

A capstone experience meant to tie together previous course work into a "hands-on" application in a job setting. A minimum of 160 hours of actual work site experience may be in any vocational avenue available including cardiac rehabilitation, strength and conditioning coaching, commercial fitness, corporate fitness, and personal training. Specific concentrations require supervision by a licensed professional (e.g., Chiropractor, Physical Therapist, Occupational Therapist).
Pre / Co requisites: EXS 490 requires prerequisites of EXS 381, EXS 482, and EXS 484.
Consent: Permission of the Department required to add.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

EXS 491. Internship II. 3-6 Credits.

A supplemental experience to EXS 490 which will enable students to explore other internship or work settings including cardiac rehabilitation, strength and conditioning coaching, commercial fitness, corporate fitness and personal training. The experience can be at the same site as EXS 490. Hours required range between 125 (for three credits) to 250 hours (for six credits).
Pre / Co requisites: EXS 491 requires Co-requisite of EXS 489.
Consent: Permission of the Department required to add.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.
Repeatable for Credit.

EXS 499. Special Topics. 1-3 Credits.

This course will examine selected topics of temporal or special interest that are not normally part of the regular ongoing exercise science curriculum. Students will be provided an opportunity to pursue research, study, and/or application of knowledge and development of skills in an applied setting, which may include an off-campus component.
Repeatable for Credit.

KIL

KIL 363. Adapted Physical Activity Practicum. 1 Credit.

Practicum experience working in an adapted physical activity setting. Includes writing and implementing lessons and individual goals.
Pre / Co requisites: KIL 363 requires prerequisites of KIN 205 and KIN 206 or KIN 252.

KIN

KIN 101. Intro to Adventure Based Educ. 3 Credits.

A course designed for the student to understand the adventure approach to experiential education in various environments. The students will have the opportunity to experience an adventure curriculum including initiatives, problem-solving activities, and low and high ropes course elements.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

KIN 102. Adventure and Contemporary Activities. 2 Credits.

Provides future physical educators with the knowledge and skills necessary to instruct, demonstrate, and assess a variety of adventure and contemporary activities. Students will be able to setup, facilitate and process various ground initiatives as well as low and high ropes course elements. Students will also become proficient performing various contemporary or "alternative" activities such as mountain biking, orienteering and tchoukball among others.
Typically offered in Spring.

KIN 103. Introduction to Teaching Physical Education. 3 Credits.

Students will gain an introduction to the field and basic foundational knowledge that will be used in succeeding coursework. The majority of the course will focus on best practices in physical education instruction and quality physical education programs. Students will have multiple opportunities to develop lesson plans and teach those plans at a local elementary school. Topics also include advising, clearances, ethics, health education, sub-disciplines of kinesiology and the history of physical education. Clearances must be presented during the first week of classes to remain enrolled, see the College of Education.
Typically offered in Fall.

KIN 104. Fitness and Wellness I. 2 Credits.

Fitness and Wellness I is designed to provide Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE) students the foundational knowledge needed for teaching a comprehensive K-12 fitness and wellness curriculum. PETE students will gain the knowledge and skills they need to make meaningful and lasting behavior changes needed for living a healthy lifestyle. They will examine contemporary literature and research on fitness and wellness and participate in, design, implement, and assess numerous pedagogical activities.
Typically offered in Fall.

KIN 105. Fitness and Wellness II. 2 Credits.

This course (FW2) builds upon the information and concepts established in Fitness and Wellness I (FW1). While FW1's foci were on scholastic curriculum and pedagogy, FW2 examines individual subjects commonly taught in public school physical education. In this course students will a) examine best instructional practices, b) study developmentally appropriate content, and c) apply pedagogical content knowledge by planning, teaching, and assessing fitness and wellness content. The goal of this course is to provide Physical Education Teacher Certification students with contemporary content and methods necessary to teach meaningful and effective classes.
Pre / Co requisites: KIN 105 requires a prerequisite of KIN 104.
Typically offered in Spring.

KIN 110. American Sign Language I. 3 Credits.

This is the first in a sequence of 4 American Sign Language courses. Students in this course will develop a fundamental vocabulary and understanding of American Sign Language. You will recognize, comprehend, apply and demonstrate culturally appropriate linguistic behaviors (vocabulary selection, grammar usage, turn-taking skills, feedback signals, eye-gaze, etc.) in order to communicate with other students and signers. In addition, information will be provided about deaf culture, general impact, barriers and opportunities related to hearing loss and Deaf Gain.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.
Cross listed courses CSD 110, KIN 110.

KIN 111. American Sign Language II. 3 Credits.

This is the second of 4 courses in the ASL foreign language option. In this course students will increase communication skills; develop conversational skills in ASL. The students in this course will also continue to expand their knowledge of deaf culture by being provided with a better understanding of cultural values and behavioral roles of the Deaf community on the U.S. This course includes receptive and expressive activities, sign vocabulary, grammatical structure, receptive and expressive finger spelling, and facial expressions and body language.
Pre / Co requisites: KIN 111 requires a prerequisite of KIN 110 or CSD 110.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.
Cross listed courses CSD 111, KIN 111.

KIN 140. Aquatic Fundamentals/ Emergency Water Safety. 2 Credits.

Review of basic aquatic skills with advanced stroke techniques, safety, and survival techniques.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

KIN 186. Motor Development and Motor Learning. 3 Credits.

Understanding how children and adolescents acquire motor skills and become a skillful movers requires an integration of knowledge from the fields of motor development and motor learning. Motor development focuses on the progressive age-related changes in motor behavior attributed to growth, development and maturation. Motor learning focuses on the relatively permanent changes in motor behavior brought about by practice and experience. The focus of motor development and motor learning each provides a unique aspect to understanding the motor behavior of the moving child and adolescent; however it is the relationship between the aspects that provide a rich understanding of how both acquire motor skills. Physical education teachers must be able to use motor development knowledge to design goals appropriate for the developmental stage and perceptual motor abilities of the learner; and use motor learning knowledge to design appropriate movement tasks and practice conditions for the type of skill.
Typically offered in Fall.

KIN 201. Developmental Gymnastics and Dance. 2 Credits.

The purpose of this two-credit course is to provide health and physical education teacher candidates with the appropriate methods, materials, and skills needed for teaching gymnastics and dance in the K-12 physical education curriculum. Focus will be placed on the development of skills and concepts as they relate to gymnastics and dance.
Typically offered in Fall.

KIN 202. Invasion Games. 2 Credits.

The course will incorporate three elements throughout the semester: teaching, performance, and analysis. The Tactical Games Approach for all subjects will be utilized along with a clear focus on an Invasion Game concept, will be used to develop a clear and logical teaching approach to various physical education subjects. With this approach the students will learn each sport in its entirety, not just the specific skills used when in possession of the ball or disc. Students will be required to develop fundamental demonstration skills for each sport while simultaneously learning the skill progression for each. After learning each skill, the students will then perform systematic analyses on their classmate's performance on various motor skill elements.
Typically offered in Fall.

KIN 203. Net and Wall Games. 2 Credits.

The course provides future physical educators with the knowledge and skills necessary to instruct, demonstrate, and assess the lifetime sports of tennis, badminton, volleyball, and pickleball. The Tactical Games Approach for all subjects will be utilized along with a clear focus on the Invasion Games concept and will be used to develop a clear and logical teaching approach to various physical education topics. With this approach students will learn the different sports in their entirety, not just specific skills used when in possession of the ball. Students will be required to develop fundamental demonstration skills for each sport while simultaneously learning the skill progression for each. After learning each skill, the students will then perform systematic analyses on their classmate's performances on various motor skill elements.
Typically offered in Spring.

KIN 205. Curriculum and Instruction: Inclusion in Health & Physical Education. 3 Credits.

To provide Health and Physical Education majors with the skills, knowledge and attitudes: 1) to provide individuals with disabilities appropriate physical education/activity in inclusive setting, 2) to prepare participants with disabilities for lifetime physical activity and fitness pursuits in the school and community settings, 3) to advocate for appropriate physical activities for individuals with disabilities; 4) to modify the environment for participation of individuals with disabilities to the maximal extent possible in the general physical education class/community based settings; 5) to assess students with disabilities and make recommendations for goals, objectives, specially designed instruction, placement, and modifications to curriculum, equipment, and other support services; 6) to work as a team player on the multidisciplinary team.
Pre / Co requisites: KIN 205 requires prerequisites of KIN 103 and KIN 186. KIN 205 requires a co-requisite of KIN 206. Field clearances required.
Typically offered in Spring.

KIN 206. Adapted PE & Health for Students with Disabilities. 3 Credits.

Through classroom and hands-on teaching experiences this course will provide health and physical education teacher certification majors with the skills, knowledge and attitudes to meet the needs of students with disabilities in inclusive and segregated health and physical education classes and to meet the NASPE beginning teacher standards and the PA chapter 49.13 special education standards.
Pre / Co requisites: KIN 206 requires prerequisites of KIN 103, KIN 186, and field clearances. KIN 206 requires a co-requisite of KIN 205.
Typically offered in Spring.

KIN 210. Intermediate American Sign Language I. 3 Credits.

This course is the third in a sequence of 4 ASL courses.In this class you will build on what was learned in KIN/CSD 110 11, continuing to emphasize the development of proper ASL grammar, syntax and vocabulary with emphasis on conversation and narration/storytelling. Vocabulary-building and mastery of grammar will be through rigorous receptive and expressive language activities. Topics discussed in ASL include the location and description of items in rooms and buildings, complaints, making suggestions, and making requests. Exposure to and knowledge of Deaf culture is an integral part of the course.
Pre / Co requisites: KIN 210 requires a prerequisite of KIN 111 or CSD 111.
Typically offered in Fall.
Cross listed courses KIN 210, CSD 210.

KIN 211. Intermediate American Sign Language II. 3 Credits.

This is the final course in the WCU American Sign Language program and provides students with opportunities to expand their sign production and comprehension skills in ASL. Students continue to expand their awareness of ASL conventions, grammar and vocabulary, including an extensive review of topical signs and idioms. Students develop a greater competency in their receptive understanding of connected ASL discourse and in their expression of extended ideas, concepts, and stories in ASL. Their expressive competency in discussion of ideas includes an expression of their understanding of Deaf culture. Students continue the growth of their technical awareness of Deaf culture and ASL linguistics.
Pre / Co requisites: KIN 211 requires a prerequisite of KIN 210 or CSD 210.
Typically offered in Spring.
Cross listed courses CSD 211, KIN 211.

KIN 246. Sport, Culture and Society. 3 Credits.

Current theories and research in the area of sport and society will be introduced. Focus of the course is interdisciplinary, incorporating sociological, psychological, historical, anthropological, philosophical, and economic perspectives. Topics include moral, ethical, racial, and gender issues in sport in relation to the North American culture.
Gen Ed Attribute: Diversity Requirement, Interdisciplinary Requirement.

KIN 253. Adapted Aquatics, Lifetime Sport and Fitness. 3 Credits.

Course designed to increase knowledge and skills in providing appropriate and safe adapted aquatics, sports, and fitness activities to individuals with disabilities. Outside hours required.
Typically offered in Fall.

KIN 254. Disability Studies: An Interdisciplinary Introduction. 3 Credits.

A study of the psychological and social implications of physical disabilities.
Gen Ed Attribute: American Sign Language Culture Cluster, Diversity Requirement, Foreign Language Culture Cluster.
Distance education offering may be available.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

KIN 255. Introduction to Deaf Studies. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to topics central to the Deaf and Deaf community, including etiology and prevalence, diagnosis, service delivery systems, medical advances, communication, education, literature, history and media. Utilizing readings, lectures, and group discussion, students will learn about the anatomy and causes of deafness, medical, therapeutic and vocational interventions, early intervention and education of deaf children, communication strategies and their effectiveness, Deaf/Hearing relationships, and Deaf literature and media. Upon course completion, students will understand deaf individuals and their community in a holistic perspective and apply this knowledge toward their future studies into Deaf culture and ASL.
Pre / Co requisites: KIN 255 requires prerequisite KIN/CSD 110/111 or permission of instructor.
Typically offered in Fall.

KIN 275. Lifeguarding. 2 Credits.

Theory and techniques relative to preventive lifeguarding, emergencies in and around water, water rescues, search and recovery operations, types and uses of equipment, records and reports, health and sanitation, and supervision of waterfront areas. Possibility of American Red Cross certification.

KIN 300. Curriculum and Instruction Elementary PE. 3 Credits.

Students in this course will examine the design, implementation and assessment of an elementary physical education program.
Pre / Co requisites: KIN 300 requires prerequisites of KIN 201 and KIN 205.
Typically offered in Fall.

KIN 302. Curriculum and Instruction Mid-Sec PE. 3 Credits.

This third course in pedagogy will relate all topics to the middle and secondary physical education setting. Intended to give students a comprehensive overview of topics that relate to the planning, execution and reflection of lessons presented in the physical education setting.
Pre / Co requisites: KIN 302 requires prerequisites of KIN 205 and KIN 206 and Formal Admission to Teacher Education.
Typically offered in Spring.

KIN 310. Fingerspelling and Numbers in ASL. 3 Credits.

Development of expressive and receptive skills in fingerspelling and numbers. Receptive skills focus on whole word phase recognition and fingerspelling/number comprehension in text. Expressive skills focus on the development of speech clarity and fluency. Students will learn how to sign cardinal numbers, ordinal numbers, time, money, dates, addresses, and telephone numbers. Fingerspelling will be developed with an emphasis on real world situations.
Pre / Co requisites: CSD 111 requires prerequisite of CSD 110.

KIN 331. Water Safety Instruction. 2 Credits.

This course is designed to prepare individuals to become swim instructors. Testing during the first week includes a 500-yard swim, basic rescue procedures, and a written community water safety test. Opportunity exists to become an American Red Cross water safety instructor.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

KIN 347. Software Applications and Assessment HPE. 3 Credits.

Students apply word processing and graphics software to produce knowledge tests, worksheets, skill checklists, certificates of merit, and public relations handouts. Spreadsheet software will be applied to budget and inventory projects. Grading, crossword puzzle, computer-assisted instruction, and physical fitness assessment software also will be applied. Students also will learn e-mail.
Typically offered in Spring.

KIN 355. Deaf History. 3 Credits.

The deaf experience is similar in many ways to the experience of many oppressed populations. Unique to the deaf experience is the mode of communication and the desire of hearing people to "fix problems" associated with deafness. This course will provide an in-depth investigation into the deaf experience. Specifically, this course will focus on historical aspects of deaf people and apply that knowledge to understanding the attitudes and expectations of deaf people today.

KIN 360. Path for Adapted Phys Act Specialists. 3 Credits.

Study of common disabling conditions with regard to anatomical and physiological changes.
Typically offered in Spring.

KIN 362. Assessment and Programming Adapt Phy Act. 3 Credits.

For students who want to specialize in adapted physical education. To improve students' understanding of evaluation and programming in the psychomotor domain for special populations. Principles of therapeutic exercise, and guidelines for exercise programs for those disabilities commonly seen in schools and fitness centers.
Typically offered in Spring.

KIN 400. Professional Seminar - Adapted Physical Activity. 3 Credits.

Issues and current events in the professional development of adapted physical activity specialists.

KIN 402. Physical Education Practicum. 3 Credits.

Field-based teaching experience in K-12 health and physical education.
Pre / Co requisites: KIN 402 requires prerequisites of KIN 102, KIN 104, KIN 201, KIN 202, KIN 203, KIN 300, KIN 302, and KIN 140 or KIN 275; field clearances; FATE (formal admission to teacher education required).
Typically offered in Fall.

KIN 410. Linguistics of ASL. 3 Credits.

The linguistic structure of sign languages. How sign languages around the world differ, and what properties they share. Accents and dialects in sign languages. How sign languages are similar and different from spoken languages. How and why sign languages have emerged.
Pre / Co requisites: KIN 410 requires a prerequisite of KIN 210 or CSD 210.

KIN 448. Research Lab Techniques In Prevent Medicine. 3 Credits.

Research laboratory techniques in preventive medicine.
Pre / Co requisites: KIN 448 requires prerequisite of BIO 209.

KIN 452. Principles Of Coaching. 3 Credits.

Principles and methods of coaching sports in the school program.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

KIN 457. ASL Literature. 3 Credits.

Introduction to American Sign Language literature analyzes genres in their social and cultural contexts as expressions of Deaf identity and the Deaf experience, as well as how historical and current issues in Deaf culture are represented in literary form. Focus will be on art, traditional folklore, storytelling, poetry, drama, oratory, jokes, and nonfiction narrative.

KIN 458. Physical Disabilities Of Childhood. 2 Credits.

A course designed for students in special education. Common orthopedic and neurological disabilities of childhood, especially chronic deviations. Emphasis is on understanding the medical aspects and problems of rehabilitation.

KIN 465. Mechanical Analysis Of Motor Skill. 3 Credits.

A problem-solving approach to skill analysis using qualitative and quantitative video and cinematographic analysis as well as elementary force-time and accelerometry techniques. Useful for teachers, trainers, coaches, and exercise professionals.

KIN 473. Independent Study and Special Projects. 1-3 Credits.

Provide an opportunity for selected students to pursue areas of special interest and talent or to take advantage of special conferences or seminars.
Consent: Permission of the Department required to add.

KIN 475. Mental Training In Sport. 3 Credits.

Techniques of mental training for sport and physical activity, including relaxation training, concentration skills, breathing regulation, positive imagery, autogenic training, and meditation.
Typically offered in Spring.

KIN 489. Student Teaching. 6 Credits.

Health and physical education teaching situations in elementary, junior, and senior high schools under qualified cooperating teachers and college supervisors.
Pre / Co requisites: KIN 489 requires prerequisites of KIN 402, HEA 304, HEA 306, HEA 440 with a grade of C or better and formal admission into teacher education. All field clearances required and successful completion of Praxis II test.
Typically offered in Spring.

KIN 490. Student Teaching. 6 Credits.

Observation and participation in health and physical education teaching situations in elementary, junior, and senior high schools under qualified cooperating teachers and college supervisors.
Pre / Co requisites: KIN 490 requires prerequisites of KIN 402, HEA 304, HEA 306, HEA 440 and formal admission into teacher education. All field clearances needed and successful completion of Praxis II test.
Typically offered in Spring.
Repeatable for Credit.

KIN 498. Physical Education Workshop. 1-3 Credits.

Contact department for more information about this course.
Repeatable for Credit.

PEA

PEA 100. Basic Swimming (Non Swimmers). 2 Credits.

Contact department for more information about this course.

PEA 115. Physical Conditioning. 2 Credits.

Contact department for more information about this course.
Repeatable for Credit.

PEA 116. Personal Defense. 2 Credits.

Contact department for more information about this course.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

PEA 120. Badminton. 2 Credits.

Contact department for more information about this course.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

PEA 123. Golf. 2 Credits.

Contact department for more information about this course.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

PEA 125. Women's Gymnastics. 2 Credits.

Contact department for more information about this course.

PEA 128. Tennis. 2 Credits.

Contact department for more information about this course.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

PEA 129. Fitness Through Basketball. 2 Credits.

Contact department for more information about this course.

PEA 137. Strength Training. 2 Credits.

Contact department for more information about this course.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

PEA 140. Aerobic Fitness. 2 Credits.

Contact department for more information about this course.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

PEA 141. Water Fitness. 2 Credits.

Contact department for more information about this course.

PEA 142. Yoga. 3 Credits.

Contact department for more information about this course.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

PEA 143. Yoga II. 3 Credits.

The purpose of this course is to provide each student with the opportunity to develop his or her yoga practice in order to realize the potential for self awareness and appreciation for healthy living that can be achieved through the continued practice of yoga.
Pre / Co requisites: PEA 143 requires prerequisite of PEA 142.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

PEA 144. T'ai Chi Ch'uan. 3 Credits.

This course will be the study of a martial art that combines movement with chi. T'ai Chi Ch'uan uses the principals of Yin-Yang and the Five Element theories and is compatible with Chinese medicine, acupuncture, and Chinese herb treatment. The name refers to the Chinese concept of the Grand Ultimate, or of Yin and Yang. T'ai Chi Ch'uan is performed slowly and with smooth continuous motion, unlike most other martial arts that are performed with speed and power. T'ai Chi Ch'uan builds power internally and does not rely on body strength alone and can be practiced from childhood into old age with no risk to the practitioner. The study of movement, skeletal structure and T'ai Chi as a Meditative Art will be included in the courses.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

PEA 146. Pilates. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to provide each student with the skill and knowledge to perform the 6 basic principles that are the core of the Pilates method - Centering, Concentration, Control, Precision, Breathing, and Flowing Movement. Exercises and activities are developed to assist students in strengthening musculature, in spinal alignment and in gaining effective breathing.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

PEA 236. Developing Personal Fitness Programs. 2 Credits.

This course, designed for nontraditional students and students with disabilities, provides an understanding of the scientific basis of physical fitness. The course is intended to help each student develop a personal fitness profile and subsequent program of physical activity that will result in healthful living. The course will make use of practical experience and actual participation in fitness activities. Individual programs will be emphasized.

PEA 242. Yoga III. 3 Credits.

This course is the third in the Yoga sequence and will provide further development of Yoga skills for the participant. Individual interested in teaching Yoga will explore teaching methodology and will address the individual requirements established by the Yoga Alliance.
Pre / Co requisites: PEA 242 PREREQ: PEA 142 and PEA 143 or permission of instructor.
Typically offered in Spring.

PEA 244. T'ai Chi Ch'uan II. 3 Credits.

The goal of this course is to provide students with an advanced knowledge and skill sets required to practice the art of T'ai Chi Ch'uan and Push Hands. Longevity and rejuvenation are the primary goals of Tai' Chi, a system of slow, gentle, non-strenuous movements ideal for persons of any age who want to stay flexible, increase their energy and reduce stress. T'ai Chi promotes health, balance, coordination and tranquility. It leads to more graceful effortless movement in everyday life. This is an ideal opportunity to try out this wonderful, low stress form of exercise.
Typically offered in Spring.