Department of Kinesiology

College of Health Sciences

206 Sturzebecker Health Sciences Center
West Chester University
West Chester, PA 19383
610-436-2260
Department of Kinesiology
Dr. Stevens, Interim Chairperson
Dr. Whidden, Assistant Chairperson - Exercise Science Division
Dr. Cleland, Assistant Chairperson - Health and Physical Education: Teacher Certification; Graduate Coordinator - M.S. in Physical Education
Dr. Atkinson, Graduate Coordinator - M.P.A. with a Graduate Certificate in Sport Management and Athletics
Dr. Stearne, Graduate Coordinator - M.S. in Exercise and Sport Physiology
Dr. Cattano, Graduate Coordinator - M.S. in Exercise and Sport Physiology: Athletic Training Concentration
Dr. Ellis, Graduate Coordinator - Certificate in Adapted Physical Education

Programs of Study

The Department of Kinesiology offers two programs leading to a master of science degree, one in exercise and sport physiology and the other in general physical education. The M.S. in Exercise and Sport Physiology, which also offers a concentration in athletic training, enriches academic preparation for working in adult fitness, cardiac rehabilitation, and corporate wellness. The M.S. in General Physical Education offers academic course work for teaching physical education in schools or for obtaining employment in various professions related to physical education. Both master of science degrees offer thesis tracks that are designed primarily to meet the individual needs of graduate students who want to pursue graduate work beyond the master's degree or a career in research.

In addition, the department offers a master of public administration degree with a graduate certificate in sport management and athletics and graduate certificate in administration. This professional degree focuses on the comprehensive career preparation of practicing athletic and sport managers. Designed for individuals aspiring to leadership and management roles in the complex world of interscholastic, intercollegiate, recreational, and professional sports, as well as corporate fitness programs, the curriculum is built on acquiring the experiential understanding of administrative and managerial practices in athletic settings. It will prepare candidates with the knowledge and skill necessary to apply theory, research, and experience to solve academic, athletic, and sport/event management challenges. Culminating internships are an integral part of the program where students are mentored in sport management experiences within their concentration area, including interscholastic (middle and high school), intercollegiate (NCAA Division I, II, or III), professional (major or minor leagues), club or recreational activities (YMCA and other youth sport organizations), and corporate fitness.

All applicants to one of West Chester University’s graduate programs will be held to the graduate admissions requirements. When applicable, additional requirements for admission into specific department program(s) may be listed below.

Admission Requirements for the M.S. in Physical Education

In addition to meeting the general requirements for admission to a graduate degree program at West Chester University, applicants must present either a baccalaureate degree earned in their anticipated major area of health or health and physical education, or equivalent preparation in a related field, and the following:

  1. Undergraduate prerequisites:
    1. Human anatomy
    2. Human physiology
    3. Kinesiology
    4. Exercise physiology
  2. Requirements of a 2.8 G.P.A. or higher on a 4.0 scale in either the thesis track or research report track
  3. Approval of application by the department graduate committee

Acceptance recommendations are made by the department graduate committee.

Admission Requirements for the M.S. in Exercise and Sport Physiology

In addition to meeting the general requirements for admission to a graduate program at West Chester University, applicants must present a bachelor's degree in exercise science or related field and have satisfied the following prerequisites prior to admission:

  • Anatomy and Physiology (I and II)
  • Exercise Physiology
  • Biomechanics or Kinesiology
  • Statistics

Students may be accepted provisionally while taking one or more of the prerequisites.

Requirements for one of the following tracks:

Thesis Track

  1. GPA: 2.8 or higher on a 4.0 scale
  2. GRE: 1000 (combined verbal and math) or higher recommended

Research Report Track

  1. GPA: 2.8 or higher on a 4.0 scale
  2. GRE: 900 (combined verbal and math) or higher recommended
  3. Approval of application by the department graduate committee

Acceptance recommendations are made by the department graduate committee.

Admission Requirements for the M.P.A. with a Graduate Certificate in Sport Management and Athletics

In addition to meeting the graduate requirements for admission to a graduate program at West Chester University, applicants must submit an essay with a clear focus on career plans and two letters of reference from professional supervisors that address the applicant's administrative potential. All application materials are to be submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies and labeled: "Attention, M.P.A. Application of (student's name)." Following receipt of these materials, the M.P.A. director will review the admissions admissions docket of the applicant.

All graduate students are held to the academic policies and procedures outlined in the graduate catalog. Students are encouraged to review departmental handbooks for program tips, suggested course sequences, and explanations of procedures. When applicable, additional policies for specific department programs may be listed below.

Requirements for the M.S. in Physical Education

  1. Satisfactory completion of the M.S. curriculum with a minimum GPA of 3.0
  2. Satisfactory performance on written and/or oral comprehensive examination
  3. Successful completion of the thesis or research project
  4. Oral defense of the thesis (for thesis track only)

Admission to M.S. Degree Candidacy

During the 12 to 15 hours of precandidacy, students must complete any three of the departmental core courses with a minimum GPA for these and all other courses of 3.0.

Students must apply for candidacy within one semester after completing 12-15 hours of precandidacy.

Requirements for the M.S. Degree in Exercise and Sport Physiology

  1. Satisfactory completion of the M.S. curriculum with a GPA of 3.0
  2. Satisfactory performance on written and/or oral comprehensive examination (not required for the athletic training concentration)
  3. Successful completion of the thesis or research project (EXS 698 Research I/EXS 699 Research II)
  4. Oral defense of the thesis (for thesis track only)

Requirements for Admission to Degree Candidacy

During the 12 to 15 hours of precandidacy, students must complete any three of the departmental core courses with a minimum GPA for these and all other courses of 3.0.

Students must apply for candidacy within one semester after completing 12-15 hours of precandidacy course work.

Requirements for the M.P.A. with a Graduate Certificate in Sport Management and Athletics

  1. Satisfactory completion of the M.P.A. curriculum with a minimum overall GPA of 3.0.

Admission to M.P.A. Degree Candidacy

During the 15 semester hours of precandidacy, majors in the graduate certificate program must complete three of the administrative core courses, and two of the sport and athletic administration core courses with a minimum GPA for these courses of 3.0.

Professors

Eve Atkinson (2008)

B.S., M.S., West Chester University; D.Ed., Temple University

Frances E. Cleland (1994)

Graduate Coordinator, Kinesiology

Assistant Chairperson, Kinesiology

B.S., Purdue University; M.S., P.E.D., Indiana University

Kathleen Ellis (2009)

Graduate Coordinator, Kinesiology

B.A., University of North Carolina at Wilmington; M.Ed., Bowling Green State University; Ph.D., Michigan State University

Frank F. Fry (1993)

B.S., West Chester University; M.Ed., Colorado State University; D.PE., Springfield College

John G. Helion (1990)

B.S., State University of New York; M.A., Ed.M., Ed.D., Columbia University

Monica P. Lepore (1983)

B.S., College of Mount Saint Vincent; M.S., University of Wisconsin; Ed.D., New York University

Margaret Ottley (2001)

B.A., Spelman College; M.Ed., Ph.D., New York University

David J. Stearne (2005)

Graduate Coordinator, Kinesiology

B.A., Rowan University; M.S., University of Florida; Ph.D., Temple University

W. Craig Stevens (1992)

Chairperson, Kinesiology

B.A., Johns Hopkins University; M.S., Springfield College; Ph.D., Temple University

Karin A.e. Volkwein (1992)

Staatsexamen, University of Marburg (Germany); Ph.D., University of Tennessee

Associate Professors

Stanley J. Cramer (2000)

B.S., M.S., West Chester University; Ph.D., Temple University

Matthew Cummiskey (2009)

B.S., Ithaca College; M.S., State University of New York at Cortland; Ph.D., Temple University

Melissa A. Reed (2011)

B.S., East Stroudsburg University; M.A., Ph.D., East Carolina University

Melissa A. Whidden (2011)

Assistant Chairperson, Kinesiology

B.S., M.S., State University of New York at Buffalo; Ph.D., University of Florida

Assistant Professors

Kenneth Clark (2016)

B.A., Swarthmore College; M.S., West Chester University; Ph.D., Southern Methodist University

Hyunsoo Kim (2016)

B.A., M.A., Yonsei University; M.S., University of North Carolina, Greensboro; Ph.D., Brigham Young University

Selen Razon (2016)

B.S. Université Paris 5 René Descartes, France; M.S. University of Miami; Ph.D. Florida State University

Instructor

Ed Kubachka (2016)

B.S., Pennsylvania State University; B.S., M.S., West Chester University

EXS

EXS 572. Advanced Motor Learning. 3 Credits.

An investigation of the theories, research, and practical applications of the processes and conditions involved in the teaching and learning of physical skills.
Typically offered in Fall.

EXS 585. Biomechanics. 3 Credits.

A review of, or introduction to, the basic principles of biomechanics and the application of those principles to research and teaching.
Typically offered in Fall.

EXS 587. Environmental Physiology. 3 Credits.

A survey course investigating the multidisciplinary nature of environmental physiology. It will explore the impact of different environments on the physiology of humans while at work and play. This course will examine the thermal environments (hot, cold, humidity), baraphysiology (altitude and depth), microgravity and space, air pollution, and chronobiological rhythms. Laboratory experiences, both computer simulation and "hands-on", will be included in the course. EXS 681 recommended.
Pre / Co requisites: EXS 587 requires prerequisite EXS 380 or BIO 468 or BIO 469. EXS 681 is recommended.

EXS 600. Rsrch Methods In Hlth, Phys Ed, Recreat. 3 Credits.

Techniques of research applied to the field of health, physical education, and recreation.
Typically offered in Fall.

EXS 640. Applied Sport and Exercise Psychology. 3 Credits.

This course aimed at covering psychological influences on sport performance and exercise behaviors in a diverse population. Additionally, it will cover how sport and exercise performance and behaviors impact psychological processes. Students will use existing theory in developing best practices for working directly with the population. They will begin to employ sport and exercise consulting techniques and strategies in a classroom setting with their peers.

EXS 641. Group Dynamics in Sport and Exercise. 3 Credits.

EXS 641 is a graduate course designed to acquaint students with theory, research and practical issues associated with group dynamics and team cohesion in a sport and exercise setting. The course will address leadership, group/team processes, and team building. Students will learn about the impact of roles, communication, accountability and diversity on team function and dysfunction. Students will engage in both theoretical and practical lessons associated with team dynamics to ensure they leave with a more complete understanding of what is both effective and ineffective in building a united team and achieving a successful outcome.

EXS 645. Sport & Exercise Psychology Practicum. 3 Credits.

This course will be a mentored experience in the organization, delivery and evaluation of applied psychological skills training and behavioral interventions with sport and/or exercise participants.

EXS 680. Scientific Principles Of Coaching. 3 Credits.

Recent trends in theories and techniques of teaching sports. Mechanical principles of efficient movement. Research related to competitive performance. Specialists serve as guest panelists.

EXS 681. Advanced Exercise Physiology. 3 Credits.

Clinical and laboratory use of exercise in evaluating, maintaining, and modifying human physiological processes: growth development, metabolism, and weight control; cardiovascular and respiratory functions in health and disease; and neuromuscular integration and performance. Stress physiology, and training and conditioning.
Typically offered in Spring.

EXS 687. Applied Muscular Physiology. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to provide an in-depth understanding of the structure and function of skeletal muscle and its responses and adaptations to exercise.
Typically offered in Spring.

EXS 688. Applied Cardiovascular Physiology. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to provide an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms underlying cardiovascular function and the effects of acute and chronic exercise on these mechanisms.
Typically offered in Spring.

EXS 690. Exercise and Older Adults. 3 Credits.

A course designed to prepare professionals to assess fitness levels of persons over the age of 50 and scientifically design exercise and fitness programs to meet the specific needs of the older participant.
Distance education offering may be available.

EXS 691. Adv Clinical Exercise Testing & Prescrip. 3 Credits.

An in-depth study of how exercise is used in clinical settings for diagnostic, rehabilitative, and preventive purposes. ACSM guidelines will be emphasized. Designed to prepare the student for the ACSM certification exam (exercise specialist).

EXS 692. Clinical Practicum in Exercise Science. 3 Credits.

The course provides experience in a clinical setting under the supervision of qualified medical staff. Experience will include exercise prescription and supervision of exercise of patients in settings such as hospitals and outpatient clinics.
Consent: Permission of the Department required to add.

EXS 698. Research I. 3 Credits.

This course along with the subsequent EXS 699, is the culminating experience in the program curriculum. It includes development of hypothesis and methods under the direction of a faculty advisor. If taken to theses, this course should culminate in the acceptance of the thesis proposal by an appropriate committee of faculty. If taken as either a report or theses, the course results in the writing of the first three chapters (Introduction, Review of Literature and Methods) and IRB approval.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

EXS 699. Research II. 3 Credits.

This course includes data collection, statistical analysis, and the writing of the last three chapters of the report/thesis. Reports are submitted to the faculty research advisor for grade. Thesis must be defended and approved by the committee. After approval by the examining committee, thesis must be typed in accordance with specifications contained in the "Guide to the Preparation of the Master's Thesis", a copy of which may be obtained from departmental offices or online. After the Dean of Graduate Studies and extended education has approved the thesis, the student is responsible for transmitting all required copies to the library for binding.
Pre / Co requisites: EXS 699 requires a prerequisite of EXS 698.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

KIN

KIN 500. Contemp Probs In Phys Ed, Recreat & Athl. 3 Credits.

Problems in teaching health, physical education, and recreation; in-service aspects; factors and variables that influence solutions of these problems.

KIN 513. Theories and Principles of Sport Management. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to provide an overview of the management responsibility of the sport administrator, including planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling the sport enterprise. Emphasis will be placed on personnel, financial concerns, facility management, and public relations.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

KIN 514. Problems and Issues in Sport Management. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to provide an overview of contemporary problems and issues in sport management, including an analysis of sport trends with a review of sport-governing agencies and organizations and their affect on athletic department programs.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

KIN 521. Adventure Based Education. 3 Credits.

The introduction of Adventure Education as a stand-alone component of the K-12 Physical Education curriculum will be introduced. The developmentally appropriate modification of activities from "Icebreakers" through "Initiatives Problem Solving" will be presented, analyzed and practiced in the class.

KIN 522. Foundations for Experiential Education. 3 Credits.

Adventure Education has rapidly become one of the fastest growing areas in the K-12 Physical Education curriculum. This course will examine the specific aspects of the concept known as the 'Adventure Wave' and its' relevance to the overall K-12 Physical Education curriculum. The historical underpinnings of Experiential Education as it relates to Adventure Education will be researched and discussed.

KIN 523. Essential Components for Adventure Education. 3 Credits.

The Adventure Education Model, as developed from Outward Bound and Project Adventure philosophies, and the concept of Experiential Education will be investigated as a content component within a K-12 Physical Education curriculum. Students will attempt to garner the overall concept behind the use of Adventure Education as a curricular component in programming.

KIN 524. Facilitation & Reflection in Adventure Education. 3 Credits.

Reflection is an integral component of Experiential Education and the Adventure Wave. The development of a variety of techniques, methods or 'tools' by an individual who 'leads' or facilitates experiential or adventure programming can enhance the overall educational experience for the participants as well as promote a more lasting effect. This course will introduce, investigate and provide 'practice opportunities' in a variety of techniques, methods and 'tools' for facilitators in programming.

KIN 534. Exploring The Art Of Dance. 3 Credits.

The purpose of this course shall be to provide the graduate student an opportunity to explore dance as an art form, as well as relate, to their core of study, information regarding various aspects of dance in both art and education. Topics shall include a brief history of dance, a study of dance genres, the role of dance in education, and today's trends in dance.

KIN 545. Educational Foundations of Adventure. 3 Credits.

This course will examine the specific aspects of the concept known as the "Adventure Wave" and it's relevance to the overall K-12 Physical Education curriculum.

KIN 551. Elem Phys Educ/Recreation Music Workshop. 2 Credits.

Leading and teaching rhythmic activities and singing in elementary physical education and recreation. Fundamental level. Instruction programmed music textbook; piano and guitar chords. Creating and teaching recreational and singing games.

KIN 553. Facility, Event and Risk Management in Sport. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to provide an overview of planning and management of sport facilities and events. The student will study the elements of planning and designing sport facilities while investigating the inherent risk management issues associated while operating sport venues. Additionally, the student will learn how to plan, execute, and manage various sporting events while addressing safety and risk management issues.

KIN 554. Gender Equity & Sport Law. 3 Credits.

The course entails the study and discussion of gender equity issues in sport that affect both females and males. In depth case studies on Title IX and analysis of Title IX regulations and compliance are explored. General principles of sport law as it relates to gender equity issues are reviewed. Research is conducted on various Equity in Athletics Disclosure Act (EADA) reports.
Typically offered in Summer.

KIN 570. Ldrshp In Outdoor Adventure Education. 3 Credits.

Contact department for more information about this course.

KIN 579. Inclusive Practices in Adapted Physical Education. 3 Credits.

The purpose of his course is to explore the concept of inclusive practices in physical education, observe programs and classes in the field, discuss and debate best practices in inclusion in PE, identify barriers to successful inclusive students with disabilities. This is not a course that will solve all your problems with inclusion.
Distance education offering may be available.

KIN 580. Sociol & Psychol Aspects Sport & Phys Ed. 3 Credits.

Social, psychological, and cultural factors influencing sport and physical education. Discussion of pertinent issues and research applications.

KIN 582. Assess & Develop of Indiv Programs in Adapted Physical Activity. 3 Credits.

The purpose of this course is to prepare health and physical education teachers to address the needs of children and teens with disabilities through quality assessment, development of physical education curriculum, establishment of individual, group and programs goals and objectives, adaptations to physical activities, and effective evaluation. Inclusive practices and establishment of criteria for recommendations.
Distance education offering may be available.

KIN 583. Medical & Pathological Issues Related to Adapted Physical Activity. 3 Credits.

The purpose of this course is to familiarize graduate students in Physical Education or Special Education with the health and medical issues of low incidence disabilities and the impact these issues have on participation in adapted physical activity programs.
Distance education offering may be available.

KIN 584. Disability Sport & Adapted Aquatics. 3 Credits.

The purpose of this course is to provide information about disability sports, athletics, and competitive adapted activities to physical education professionals. In addition, students in this course will understand the concepts of vertical integration, segregated vs. inclusion sport participation, rules, regulations and procedures for a variety of adapted and disability sports, and the psychosocial impact of sports on people with disabilities. Also this course will cover adapted aquatics and provide national credentialing in Teacher of Adapted Aquatics through AAHPERD if prerequisites are met, or if not, the Teaching Assistant of Adapted Aquatics Credential.
Distance education offering may be available.

KIN 586. Professional Issues in Adapted Physical Activity. 3 Credits.

The purpose of this course is to develop skills needed to be a professional adapted physical educator. Current issues being professionally debated in the field will be discussed, synthesized and explored including professional philosophy, technology use, consultation strategies and services in adapted PE, professional and ethical behaviors, confidentiality, collaboration and cross disciplinary models of service, adapted physical education national standards and exams.
Distance education offering may be available.

KIN 587. Contemporary Issues in Adapted Phy Activity: Students in the Autistic Spectrum. 3 Credits.

Introduction to the issues of adapting physical activities for individuals within the autistic spectrum including school based physical education and community based recreation programs.
Distance education offering may be available.

KIN 603. Professional Literature Seminar. 3 Credits.

Provides students with the skills necessary to review and critically analyze the professional literature and current findings in physical education; useful for the student planning to conduct research.
Distance education offering may be available.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.
Repeatable for Credit.

KIN 604. Adm/Supervision Practices for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Athletics. 3 Credits.

Nature of the positions of directors or supervisors of physical education, recreation, and athletics. Job specifications; operational principles and procedures.

KIN 605. Curricular Trends in Physical Education. 3 Credits.

Analysis and design of contemporary curriculum models of instruction in K-12 physical education.

KIN 606. Research Project Seminar I. 2 Credits.

A course for master's candidates who select the report option. Students select a problem for the research report, review literature, develop procedures, and collect data. They are expected to complete the first three chapters of their research reports during Seminar I.
Pre / Co requisites: KIN 606 requires prerequisite of KIN 600.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

KIN 607. Research Project Seminar II. 2 Credits.

Master's candidates register for this course after completing Seminar l. In this course, students complete chapters four and five of the research report.
Pre / Co requisites: KIN 607 requires prerequisite of KIN 606.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

KIN 608. Thesis Seminar. 3 Credits.

A course for the student who selects the thesis option. The candidate selects a topic, reviews the literature, develops procedures, and prepares a proposal acceptable to the thesis committee. They then register for KIN 610.
Pre / Co requisites: KIN 608 requires prerequisite of KIN 600.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

KIN 609. Independent Study & Special Projects. 1-3 Credits.

Students select independent study projects and develop proposals. These projects may be in support of students' research or related to their vocations. The proposals must be accepted and approved by the coordinator of graduate studies in the semester prior to registration for independent study.

KIN 610. Thesis. 3 Credits.

Students must register for the thesis after completion of KIN 608. One additional enrollment in KIN 610 may be allowed with the approval of the graduate coordinator.
Pre / Co requisites: KIN 610 requires prerequisite of KIN 608.

KIN 611. Intern Study I. 3 Credits.

For the MPA student in athletic administration who needs or desires practical experience in administering athletic programs. (The student may elect 3-6 credits of internship experience.)

KIN 612. Intern Study II. 3 Credits.

For the MPA student in athletic administration who needs or desires practical experience in administering athletic programs. (The student may elect 3-6 credits of internship experience.)

KIN 614. Positive Behavioral Support in Physical Education. 3 Credits.

This course examines practical psychological and sociological information for teaching physical education in today's society with an emphasis on creating a positive classroom environment, promoting positive conduct, preventing student misbehavior and effectively managing misbehavior when it arises.

KIN 615. Special Topics. 1-3 Credits.

In depth study of selected topics current to the interests and needs of professionals serving in the field of Kinesiology.
Repeatable for Credit.

KIN 650. The Child & Physical Education. 3 Credits.

Contributions of physical education to a child's physical, social, emotional, and intellectual growth and to developmental needs and interests. The influences of various activities on growth and development.