Ethics Requirement

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BIO

BIO 440. Human Genetics. 3 Credits.

A detailed survey of the principles of human heredity. Examines the impact of genetics on current issues in human medicine, pharmacology, evolution, and sociology, and evaluates ethical issues surrounding these topics.
Pre / Co requisites: BIO 440 requires a prerequisite of BIO 210.
Gen Ed Attribute: Ethics Requirement, Writing Emphasis.
Typically offered in Spring.

CRJ

CRJ 240. Criminal Investigation. 3 Credits.

This course will introduce the student to the basic principles of criminal investigation during which relevant ethical issues will be raised. It will include a review of crime scene response, evidence collection and testing during the investigation of violent, property, and other crimes. Pertinent court decisions regarding arrest, interrogation, and search and seizure will be examined.
Pre / Co requisites: CRJ 240 requires a prerequisite of a grade of C or higher in CRJ 110.
Gen Ed Attribute: Ethics Requirement, Speaking Emphasis.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

CRJ 325. Animal Cruelty. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to provide an intensive examination of the relationship between animal cruelty and the criminal justice system. It will cover the commission of animal cruelty within circumstances such as child abuse, interpersonal violence, and juvenile delinquency. This course will also cover the ethical analysis of animal cruelty and it is designed to develop oral communication skills. The final goal of the course is to offer students an understanding of the impact that animal cruelty has on society and the criminal justice system.
Pre / Co requisites: CRJ 325 requires a prerequisite of a grade of C or higher in CRJ 110.
Gen Ed Attribute: Ethics Requirement, Speaking Emphasis.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

CRJ 461. Notable Criminal Cases. 3 Credits.

Selected factual accounts of criminality and criminal behavior over the past 75 years are analyzed. Selection is based on notoriety and continued dispute. The course is designed, through reading and class analysis, to illuminate a wide spectrum of criminal conduct and the related investigative, legal, ethical, and judicial response.
Pre / Co requisites: CRJ 461 requires a prerequisite of a grade of C or higher in CRJ 110.
Consent: Permission of the Department required to add.
Gen Ed Attribute: Ethics Requirement.
Distance education offering may be available.
Typically offered in Winter.

CRJ 472. Justice Studies. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to address the successes, weaknesses and failures of our current system of justice by examining and analyzing sometimes controversial issues through critical inquiry and legal and social science investigation. The course will include in-depth discussions and analyses of often complex ethical issues that affect the investigation, prosecution, adjudication, and defense of criminal conduct.
Pre / Co requisites: CRJ 472 requires a prerequisite of a grade of C or higher in CRJ 110.
Consent: Permission of the Department required to add.
Gen Ed Attribute: Ethics Requirement.
Distance education offering may be available.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

CRJ 487. Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to identify and examine ethical issues among practitioners and students in the criminal justice field. Such issues may include the discretionary power of arrest, the use of deadly force, the decision to prosecute, participation in plea bargaining, representation of the guilty, and the imposition of punishment. Such a course will promote inquiry that combines ethical analysis with a practical awareness of the realities of the criminal justice system.
Pre / Co requisites: CRJ 487 requires a prerequisite of a grade of C or higher in CRJ 110.
Gen Ed Attribute: Ethics Requirement.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

CSC

CSC 301. Computer Security & Ethics. 3 Credits.

An introduction to Computer Security and the ethical underpinnings of security. The basic objectives of creating a secure system, attack methods and defenses are discussed.
Pre / Co requisites: CSC 301 requires prerequisites of three CSC, CST, or CSW courses.
Gen Ed Attribute: Ethics Requirement.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

EDA

EDA 363. Assessment for Students with Disabilities II. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to provide the student with the knowledge and skills needed to link assessment with instructional planning for PK-12 students with special needs. The course will emphasize the following: diagnostic and eligibility criteria for the categories of disability that are covered under IDEA, the development of a Section 504 Service Agreement, and the development of legal special education documents (i.e., Re-Evaluation Report, Individual Education Program [IEP], and NOREP).
Pre / Co requisites: EDA 363 requires prerequisites of EDA 103, EDA 203, EDA 362, and Teacher Candidacy.
Gen Ed Attribute: Ethics Requirement.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

ERM

ERM 353. Ethical and Effective Assessment for Learning: Early Grades. 3 Credits.

This course will focus on exploring ethical issues related to educational and psychological assessment. The goal of the course is to encourage students to critically evaluate ethical issues in educational and psychological testing to make informed and ethical choices with regards to assessment development, administration, results, and interpretation. This course is designed to provide students the knowledge and skills to use multiple developmentally appropriate assessments (authentic, screening, diagnostic, formative, and summative) to guide instruction related to standards, to monitor results of interventions and their implications for instruction for all students, and to report assessment results.
Pre / Co requisites: ERM 353 requires a prerequisite of EGP 220.
Gen Ed Attribute: Ethics Requirement.
Typically offered in Fall, Spring & Summer.

ERM 354. Ethical and Effective Assessment for Learning: Middle Grades. 3 Credits.

This course will focus on exploring ethical issues related to educational and psychological assessment. The goal of the course is to encourage students to critically evaluate ethical issues in educational and psychological testing to make informed and ethical choices with regards to assessment development, administration, results, and interpretation. This course is designed to provide students the knowledge and skills to use multiple developmentally appropriate assessments (authentic, screening, diagnostic, formative, and summative) to guide instruction related to standards, to monitor results of interventions and their implications for instruction for all students, and to report assessment results.
Pre / Co requisites: ERM 354 requires a corequisite of EDR 318 or MGP 335 or MAT 352 or SCE 330 and prerequisites of MGP 220, Teacher Candidacy, and field clearances.
Gen Ed Attribute: Ethics Requirement.
Typically offered in Fall, Spring & Summer.

ERM 355. Ethical and Effective Assessment for Learning 7-12. 3 Credits.

This course will focus on exploring ethical issues related to educational and psychological assessment. The goal of the course is to encourage students to critically evaluate ethical issues in educational and psychological testing to make informed and ethical choices with regards to assessment development, administration, results, and interpretation. This course is designed to provide students the knowledge and skills to use multiple developmentally appropriate assessments (authentic, screening, diagnostic, formative, and summative) to guide instruction related to standards, to monitor results of interventions and their implications for instruction for all students, and to report assessment results.
Gen Ed Attribute: Ethics Requirement.
Typically offered in Fall, Spring & Summer.

ESP

ESP 317. Utopia and Apocalypse in the Americas. 3 Credits.

What will the future hold in store for humanity: utopia or apocalypse? Toward what type of future society should we aim in the present? This course is taught from multiple perspectives and will foster thoughtful reflection on what it means to belong to a community as expressed in cultural texts and media from the Spanish-speaking Americas, including travel narratives to unknown lands, utopian treatises, science-fiction and fantasy stories, and real-world attempts to construct utopian societies. No knowledge of Spanish is required.
Gen Ed Attribute: Ethics Requirement, Foreign Language Culture Cluster, Interdisciplinary Requirement, Spanish Culture Cluster.
Typically offered in Fall, Spring & Summer.

HEA

HEA 210. Introduction to Allied Health. 3 Credits.

Study of Allied Health and the role Allied Health professionals play in the health care system. This course is open to non-Respiratory Care majors.
Gen Ed Attribute: Ethics Requirement.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

HEA 300. Profession/Ethics & Health Professions. 3 Credits.

This course examines ethical issues relevant to the professional roles of health professionals. Students will examine ethical principles and apply a model of ethical decision making to case studies. Other areas addressed include professional codes of ethics, ethical concerns in health behavior change, health communications, and health education research.
Gen Ed Attribute: Ethics Requirement.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

HIS

HIS 200. Making History: Controversies in History. 3 Credits.

This course examines the history of controversies within and concerning the discipline of History. In examining those controversies, this course accomplishes two key goals for history majors: it introduces them to the features and issues of historiography -- the history of the history discipline -- and asks them to evaluate the professional and ethical responsibilities of historians within the larger society. In particular the course examines why there have been vastly different ideas about what the purposes and uses of history ought to be, how those differences have shaped the discipline of history, how these disagreements get expressed through public, political controversies about what "correct" and "proper" history is, and how historians identify, evaluate and resolve professional and ethical conflicts within their discipline.
Consent: Permission of the Department required to add.
Gen Ed Attribute: Ethics Requirement.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

HIS 413. Nuclear War: The History of Fighting, Filming, Surviving, or Preventing One. 3 Credits.

This course examines the ethical implications of nuclear weapons; the history of the scientific, technological, social, political, and military circumstances surrounding their invention; the consequences of their use by the United States against Japan; and the ongoing ways in which their presence shapes film and literature, religion, politics, foreign affairs, ethics, and scientific research. It places particular emphasis on the United States' decision and ability to create and use the bomb, and subsequent efforts to make sense of the unfathomable power of these weapons through film, music, television, moral philosophy, and religion. The course examines how scientists, artists, and lay persons envision nuclear power as both the ultimate source of liberation and of doom, and the ethical implications of atomic diplomacy.
Gen Ed Attribute: Ethics Requirement, Interdisciplinary Requirement.
Distance education offering may be available.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

HON

HON 212. Ethics and Moral Choice in Tech Age. 3 Credits.

Approaches to ethical recommendation and moral decision-making processes. Engagement of the scientific approach by using case studies from genetics, ecology, physics, chemistry, and computer science to allow students to confront ways traditional views of ethics and moral decision-making apply to a contemporary world.
Gen Ed Attribute: Ethics Requirement, Humanities Distributive Requirement.
Typically offered in Spring.

HON 490. Honors Capstone Senior Project. 3-6 Credits.

Students will identify and investigate a problem in a community business, nonprofit agency, or research laboratory, and then work to solve the problem. Students will be expected to play an active role in the problem-solving effort and contribute a minimum of ten hours each week to help solve the problem. Students will seek interaction with the CEO, senior officer(s), and/or senior investigators of the business, agency, or laboratory, who will serve as leader models for student study. While projects are generally completed in the senior year, students may register for this course upon completion of the 27-hour core or by special permission of the Honors College Director.
Pre / Co requisites: HON 490 requires prerequisites of HON 100, HON 211, HON 212, HON 310, HON 311, HON 312 or HON 322, HON 314, and HON 315.
Gen Ed Attribute: Ethics Requirement, Speaking Emphasis, Writing Emphasis.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.
Repeatable for Credit.

INM

INM 443. Building Your Career in Music. 3 Credits.

Culmination capstone course for the music performance degrees (vocal, instrumental, jazz, keyboard, and organ). Students will review, assess, and apply integrated concepts taught during the degree and gather these materials into their WCU eportfolio. This course focuses on preparing students for employment and graduate study through performance and communication. Topics include speaking fluency during lectures and recitals, constructive feedback for pedagogy, entrepreneurship, marketing, developing a professional resume and cover letter, and includes alumni and guest lectures. Assessment is achieved through reflection papers, in-class discussion, assignments, and a capstone project. The capstone project demonstrates achievement of the program and student learning outcomes. In addition, it requires students to reflect on the integration of the General Education Program with the music performance degree. The capstone project focuses on career development of a student's specific career interests. In addition, students submit program notes of final recital material during in-class lectures for discussion, reflection, self-evaluation, and re-evaluation.
Gen Ed Attribute: Ethics Requirement, Speaking Emphasis.
Typically offered in Fall.

JRN

JRN 335. Ethical Issues in News Media. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to investigate ethical issues in the news media. This course is designed both for journalists and for all of us who read/watch/listen to the news. As a result, students will leave the course with concepts and guidance on ethical practices in journalism as well as tools with which to evaluate the ethics of various news coverage. Students will come to understand ethical frameworks and apply them to major problems and questions in the news media, with case studies coming from the course text and contemporary news coverage of current events.
Gen Ed Attribute: Ethics Requirement.
Typically offered in Spring.

LIN

LIN 300. Language and the Internet. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on how language is used online and investigates different forms of electronically-mediated communication. Students will look at the language of text messaging, social media, and other genres of online interaction to understand both the structural and social functions of digital communication from a linguistic perspective. To achieve this goal, students will examine research from various sub-fields of linguistics, including semantics, pragmatics, and sociolinguistics. This course will also offer students practice in identifying a range of perspectives on ethical issues in linguistics pertaining to both researchers as well as citizens in online spaces. Coursework will involve not only learning about linguistic approaches to examining language online, but also learning to put yourself in another's shoes to investigate issues of ethical problem-solving. Students will be introduced to different ways of analyzing digital language data and will critically discuss various research methodologies used in the field and some ethical dilemmas that accompany doing linguistic research in the digital age.
Gen Ed Attribute: Ethics Requirement.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

LNC

LNC 110. Global Human Rights in Cultural Production. 3 Credits.

This course will introduce students to the concept of Human Rights, familiarize students with the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and examine case studies of Human Rights problems from around the world. In the first half of this course, students will learn about the development of the concept of human rights through an examination of its theoretical foundations, considering the tension between universality and relativity posed by the concept of universal human rights, and problematizing what this "universality" means for societies that perhaps have other, more pressing needs/priorities not included in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. In the second half of this course, students will focus on examining a variety of human rights cases as represented in multiple cultural mediums (including films, a poem, a novel, a diary, and documentaries) and practice analyzing these cases to pinpoint the various stakeholders and their interests in the issue at hand. In class, students will learn tactical mapping and the case study method, which will be brought into class discussions throughout the second half of the course as they consider each human rights case study. Lastly, students will practice imagining themselves within these situations and think critically about the different choices of action they would have as an actor in the issue at hand. Students will practice ethical reasoning in examining how best to act as they imagine themselves navigating the complex field of these human rights questions.
Gen Ed Attribute: Ethics Requirement, Humanities Distributive Requirement.
Typically offered in Spring.

MDC

MDC 203. The Philadelphia Media Experience. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the history of media professions in the Philadelphia area, exposes them to media opportunities, and helps them to improve the skill set needed to obtain jobs in emerging media organizations. The lens for examining all of these elements is the ethical framework of analysis that underpins our field and are articulated in our Code of Professional Ethics.
Gen Ed Attribute: Ethics Requirement.
Typically offered in Spring.

MDC 420. Mass Media & Social Protest. 3 Credits.

This course will address multi-disciplinary theory and research that has contributed to our understanding of both the antecedents and consequences of mediated messages as they affect processes related to social protest. This will include analyzing the ethical codes guiding journalists covering protest groups as well as the ethics guiding protesters and their actions. Readings will draw from mass communication, political science, sociology and other disciplines to examine questions about the role of communication media in the dynamics of social protest considering both traditional and new/emerging media.
Pre / Co requisites: MDC 420 requires prerequisites of MDC 250 and MDC 251.
Gen Ed Attribute: Ethics Requirement.
Typically offered in Spring.

MGT

MGT 313. Business and Society. 3 Credits.

An analysis of the social, political, legal, environmental, and ethical problems faced by business firms.
Pre / Co requisites: MGT 313 requires prerequisites of MGT 200 (majors only) and a minimum 2.50 cumulative GPA.
Gen Ed Attribute: Ethics Requirement, Writing Emphasis.
Typically offered in Fall, Spring & Summer.

MUE

MUE 220. Music for Diverse Learners. 3 Credits.

This course provides undergraduate music education and music therapy candidates with the skills, knowledge, understandings, and attitudes necessary to meet the needs of students with diverse needs in an inclusive music education classroom, including an emphasis on ethical decision-making.
Gen Ed Attribute: Ethics Requirement.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

NSG

NSG 332. Ethics and Health Policy in Nursing. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to explore the role of ethics in healthcare and public policy. Common ethical problems are discussed and strategies for resolution of ethical dilemmas are applied. This course will address such topics as end-of-life care, living wills and advanced directives, social networking and media in Nursing, research with vulnerable populations and genomics. Focus is placed on values clarification, ethical theory, ethical decision making models, and professional ethical standards. Emphasis is on ethical obligations of professional nurses in their roles as citizens, members of a profession, providers of care, and facilitators of public health policy.
Pre / Co requisites: NSG 332 requires a prerequisite of admission to the RN-to-BSN program.
Gen Ed Attribute: Ethics Requirement, Writing Emphasis.
Distance education offering may be available.
Typically offered in Fall, Spring & Summer.

NSG 407. Concepts in Critical Care Nursing. 3 Credits.

The purpose of this course is to provide students an opportunity to enhance their knowledge and skills in the area of acute critical care nursing. Students will acquire knowledge pertaining to the pharmacological management, advanced cardiac, and respiratory concepts in the critically ill adult. Students will examine ethical principles and concepts that affect clinical practice in the acute critical care setting. Students will explore the role of the critical care nurse, and clinical observation experiences are provided in various acute critical care settings. This course has limited course enrollment and unit assignments will be based on clinical site availability.
Pre / Co requisites: NSG 407 requires prerequisites of NSG 311, NSL 311, NSG 312, and NSL 312 (grade of C or higher required); and corequisites of NSG 411 and NSL 411.
Gen Ed Attribute: Ethics Requirement.
Typically offered in Fall and Winter.

PHI

PHI 180. Introduction to Ethics. 3 Credits.

Introduction to major theories and contemporary work in moral philosophy. Offers tools for ethical decision making in our daily lives with emphasis on the influence of culture, power, privilege.
Gen Ed Attribute: Diversity Requirement, Ethics Requirement, Humanities Distributive Requirement.
Typically offered in Fall, Spring & Summer.

PLN

PLN 301. Planning History, Theory, and Ethics. 3 Credits.

Planning theory is crucial to understanding how planners make decisions. Making ethical decisions is a critical component in the everyday life of an urban planner. This course takes an in-depth look at various planning theories including comprehensive, incremental, mixed scanning, advocacy, equity, and radical approaches to planning while adhering to the American Institute of Certified Planners (AICP) code of ethics and conduct. Students examine the history and evolution of planning; planning within a democracy; how planning influences society; new directions within the field, including sustainability; and finally the relationship between planning theory, practice, and ethical decision making. As a result, it will enable students to critically understand the purpose and contribution of planning within society as well as the role of the planner, including the issues of planning ethics, professional standards and conduct, and principles of the AICP Code of Ethics.
Gen Ed Attribute: Ethics Requirement, Writing Emphasis.
Typically offered in Spring.

PSC

PSC 101. Politics of Diversity in the U.S.. 3 Credits.

This course examines American government by analyzing how historically underrepresented and marginalized groups have been represented by the American political system and its institutions. It analyzes how different theoretical approaches such as pluralism, elitism, socialism, and liberalism define concepts such as equality and liberty and how social movements have contributed to social change. By focusing on elements of political culture and social experiences of underrepresented groups, it also considers how historical and cultural contexts have shaped the differential experiences of individuals and how race, class, gender, and sexual orientation influence an individual's role in the political system. Lectures and discussions are embedded in a political science ethics framework. Questions about ethical leadership, the "character" of elected officials, and the "morality" of political decision making and resulting public policies will be examined by using ethical dilemmas and case studies.
Gen Ed Attribute: Behavioral and Social Science Distributive, Diversity Requirement, Ethics Requirement.
Distance education offering may be available.
Typically offered in Fall, Spring & Summer.

PSY

PSY 100. Introduction to Psychology. 3 Credits.

Psychology is the scientific study of behavior and its causes and the goal of psychology is to describe, explain, predict, and change behavior. Behavior is defined broadly to include mental and physiological processes, as well as observable behavior. This course provides tools to analyze why people behave the way they do, and these tools can be valuable to students across a number of different settings (e.g., work, school, family, peer, and romantic relationships). The course introduces the major concepts and findings in psychology, and it addresses topics relevant to students from diverse majors, including kinesiology, education, nursing, and marketing, to name a few. The course also introduces ethical concepts and their application in both psychology-related settings and in everyday situations.
Gen Ed Attribute: Behavioral and Social Science Distributive, Ethics Requirement.
Distance education offering may be available.
Typically offered in Fall, Spring & Summer.

PSY 476. Cognitive Laboratory. 3 Credits.

An experiential-learning course in which students learn first-hand how cognitive psychologists measure human thought processes such as perception, attention, language, memory, decision-making, and problem-solving.
Pre / Co requisites: PSY 476 requires prerequisites of PSY 245 and PSY 246, and a corequisite of PSY 475.
Gen Ed Attribute: Ethics Requirement, Writing Emphasis.
Distance education offering may be available.
Typically offered in Spring.

SWO

SWO 320. Generalist Social Work Practice I. 3 Credits.

Students apply their knowledge of the strengths and ecological perspectives to the processes of engagement, assessment, planning, implementation, evaluation, and termination for social work practice with individuals and families. Social Work majors only.
Pre / Co requisites: SWO 320 requires a corequisite or prerequisite of SWO 220 with a minimum of C or better.
Gen Ed Attribute: Ethics Requirement.
Distance education offering may be available.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

THA

THA 113. Script Analysis. 3 Credits.

Introduces and applies methods for analyzing scripts intended for theatrical performance. Additionally explores an in-depth methodology of reading, analyzing, and understanding a play script intended for production. Investigate techniques used to determine how to read a play for its structure, scrutinizing the playwright's methods of creating theatre through plot, character and imagery. Scripts inform the theater practitioner, distinctly from other forms of literature, by actively asking the theatre artisan to present questions to the audience through the production's presentation. The class learns to identify ethical questions that script brings forward. The class will discover the importance of the issues in relation to the script, today's world, the performance choices and the audience's perception of the choices made.
Gen Ed Attribute: Ethics Requirement.
Typically offered in Spring.

THA 301. Directing I. 3 Credits.

An introduction of the theories and techniques of stage direction with emphasis on prerehearsal planning, play selection, script analysis and promptbooks, casting and blocking.
Pre / Co requisites: THA 301 requires prerequisites of THA 103, THA 113, and THA 216.
Consent: Permission of the Department required to add.
Gen Ed Attribute: Ethics Requirement.
Typically offered in Fall & Spring.

WOS

WOS 260. Globalization and the Ethics of Sustainability. 3 Credits.

This course examines forces of globalization and environmental and ethical issues. The process of globalization (trade, communication technology, migration) has contributed to widening inequality within and among countries. Multinational corporations employ vulnerable people (especially women of color) for cheap labor, exploit local resources, and contribute to environmental degradation. Since the planet has its limitations, attending to the conservation of natural (and limited) resources, climate change, sustainable agriculture and forestry practices, and just fair-trade practices are at the heart of environmental and ethical issues and sustainability efforts. In this course, students will explore the social and environmental justice issues related to consumption of resources central to environmental ethics and sustainability. Students will also examine their ecological/carbon footprint and ways to reduce it through changes in the consumption of energy, resources, food, and water.
Gen Ed Attribute: Diversity Requirement, Ethics Requirement.
Typically offered in Fall.